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Updated: 1 hour 51 min ago

Post 'Downton Abbey,' Dan Stevens Embraces His Role As A Mutant On 'Legion'

Thu, 04/05/2018 - 12:39pm

Stevens, who played Matthew Crawley on Downton Abbey, now plays a young man who's grown up thinking he has schizophrenia on Legion, an FX drama that's a spin-off of the Marvel Comics X-Men series.

What Do Hamburgers Have To Do With Gender?

Thu, 04/05/2018 - 12:32pm

Meat and veggie burgers evolved together in the 20th century, but when it comes to associations with gender, their histories diverge. Anthropologist Barbara J. King explores a new book on the topic.

(Image credit: Piotr Marcinski/Getty Images/EyeEm)

'The Chandelier' Is A Stop-Motion, Shaggy Dog Masterpiece

Thu, 04/05/2018 - 9:00am

Brazilian modernist Clarice Lispector's second novel, written when she was 26, is an essentially story-free story, fragmentary and obsessed with the nature of thought — but it will carry you away.

(Image credit: Eslah Attar/NPR)

From B-Boys To X-Men: Alt-Comics' Ed Piskor Goes Mainstream

Thu, 04/05/2018 - 6:00am

Cartoonist Ed Piskor is best known for his award-winning Hip Hop Family Tree series, and for working with alt-comics legend Harvey Pekar. So how did he get Marvel to give him a shot at the X-Men?

(Image credit: Marvel Comics)

Suffering From Nature Deficit Disorder? Try Forest Bathing

Wed, 04/04/2018 - 10:54am

Positive scientific results aside, the idea of shinrin-yoku shouldn't be surprising: Who hasn't felt an inner sense of well-being when walking along a forest trail? asks commentator Marcelo Gleiser.

(Image credit: Andrew Clark/Getty Images/EyeEm)

Love (And Music And Glitter) Saves The Day In 'Space Opera'

Wed, 04/04/2018 - 9:00am

In Catherynne M. Valente's new novel, a washed-up glitter punk musician has to save all humanity by singing in an intergalactic version of the Eurovision Song Contest. (Also, there are murderhippos.)

(Image credit: Ricardo Carreon/Getty Images)

'Two Sisters' Leave Home For Syria, Tearing A Family Apart

Wed, 04/04/2018 - 6:00am

Norwegian journalist Åsne Seierstad's new book is a heartbreaking but necessary account of two teenage sisters from a moderate Muslim family who fled to war-torn Syria after becoming radicalized.

(Image credit: Eslah Attar/NPR)

An 'Exhausted' Martin Luther King Jr.'s Final 31 Hours

Wed, 04/04/2018 - 4:09am

A bomb threat, a march turned violent and a militant black power group all weighed heavily on the civil rights leader during his last speech in 1968, says Redemption author David Rosenbloom.

(Image credit: Charles Kelly/AP)

'Two Sisters' Follows Norwegian Teenagers Who Left Home To Join ISIS FIghters In Syria

Tue, 04/03/2018 - 3:21pm

When ISIS started expanding its hold on Iraq and Syria, tens of thousands of foreign fighters went to join the caliphate. In Norway, two teenage girls decided to leave their family for Syria. Their story is the subject of a new book by Norwegian journalist Asne Seierstad called, Two Sisters.

Madeleine Albright Warns: Don't Let Fascism Go 'Unnoticed Until It's Too Late'

Tue, 04/03/2018 - 1:51pm

The former secretary of state describes President Trump as "the most anti-democratic leader that I have studied in American history." Albright's new book is Fascism: A Warning.

(Image credit: Timothy Greenfield Sanders/Harper Collins)

50 Years Later, '2001: A Space Odyssey' Is Still A Cinematic Landmark

Tue, 04/03/2018 - 12:19pm

Stanley Kubrick's science-fiction epic — which opened to mixed reviews in 1968 — unknowingly foreshadowed the future of effects-driven blockbusters.

(Image credit: Warner Bros./AP)

Tell Us: Are You Unable To Retire Or Retired But Back To Work?

Tue, 04/03/2018 - 9:57am

For many Americans, retirement is no longer the long vacation they once imagined. More older adults are in the workforce than ever.

(Image credit: Katherine Du/NPR)

Meg Wolitzer Asks The Big Questions In 'The Female Persuasion'

Tue, 04/03/2018 - 9:00am

At the start of Meg Wolitzer's new novel, a young woman is groped at a fraternity party — and her question, "Why is it like this, and what are we supposed to do about it?" echoes through the book.

(Image credit: Eslah Attar/NPR)

'Legion,' Season 2: Welcome Back To The Weirdest Corner Of The Marvel Universe

Tue, 04/03/2018 - 4:01am

Showrunner Noah Hawley's defiantly trippy and visually stunning not-quite-a-superhero series returns to FX for a second season. Critic Glen Weldon says there's real substance beneath all that style.

(Image credit: Suzanne Tenner /FX)

Steven Bochco, Groundbreaking TV Producer, Dies at 74

Mon, 04/02/2018 - 3:20pm

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks to David Nevins about how producer Steven Bochco helped form the structure for many modern TV dramas. Bochco died Sunday at 74. Bochco introduced the private lives of police officers and the telling of multiple stories in each episode.

Remembering Groundbreaking Television Producer Steven Bochco

Mon, 04/02/2018 - 12:50pm

Bochco, who died Sunday, created numerous series, including Hill Street Blues and NYPD Blue. TV Critic David Bianculli looks back on Bochco's impact, then we listen to his 1989 Fresh Air interview.

'Inseparable' Recounts The Unusual Lives Of Conjoined Twins Chang And Eng Bunker

Mon, 04/02/2018 - 12:50pm

Yunte Huang's new book chronicles the lives of the "original Siamese twins," who were brought to America in 1829 and forced to perform in a freak show. They later married and fathered 21 children.

#NPRPoetry Month: What Makes A Haiku A Haiku?

Sun, 04/01/2018 - 3:58pm

Did you know that a haiku doesn't have to conform to a 5-7-5 syllable count? NPR's Sarah McCammon speaks with haiku master and former diplomat Abigail Friedman about where the misconception comes from.

A 'Ragged School' Gives U.K. Children A Taste Of Dickensian Destitution

Sun, 04/01/2018 - 3:58pm

The East End of London was once synonymous with Dickensian squalor. Now it's prime real estate. A tiny museum in the back streets shows schoolchildren what life was like in the past.

(Image credit: Samuel Alwyine-Mosely/NPR)

What Drives Men To Violent Extremism

Sun, 04/01/2018 - 7:16am

Sociologist Michael Kimmel says some white men feel their place in American society is being threatened. Kimmel talks with NPR's Korva Coleman about his new book Healing from Hate.

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