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Updated: 1 hour 21 min ago

Students Compete In First-Ever International High School Robotics Competition

Mon, 07/17/2017 - 3:28pm

The first ever international high school robotics competition is happening in Washington, D.C., this week. Over 150 countries from six continents sent teams to compete.

New Research Suggests Why Mid-Sized Animals Are The Fastest

Mon, 07/17/2017 - 3:28pm

Why aren't the biggest animals with the longest limbs the fastest? New research suggests these animals run out of fuel for their fast-twitch muscles before they can reach the maximum speed their bodies could achieve. There's a golden mean for speed, and mid-sized animals like cheetahs have it.

New Research Suggests Why Mid-Sized Animals Are The Fastest

Mon, 07/17/2017 - 3:28pm

New research suggests the biggest animals run out of fuel for their fast-twitch muscles before they reach the maximum speed their bodies could achieve. Animals like cheetahs are born to run fast.

(Image credit: Thierry Falise/LightRocket via Getty Images)

In Massachusetts, Proposed Medicaid Cuts Put Kids' Health Care At Risk

Mon, 07/17/2017 - 3:16pm

Doctors, consumers and politicians say big federal cuts to Medicaid funding would jeopardize the treatment a lot of kids rely on. The state would either have to make up lost funding or cut benefits.

(Image credit: Jesse Costa/WBUR)

More Than Bread: Sourdough As a Window Into The Microbiome

Mon, 07/17/2017 - 2:47pm

Home bakers in the U.S., Europe and some other countries have volunteered their sourdough starters to a team of American scientists who want to unravel the microbial secrets of sourdough.

(Image credit: Courtesy of Benjamin Wolfe)

Elon Musk Warns Governors: Artificial Intelligence Poses 'Existential Risk'

Mon, 07/17/2017 - 9:39am

At a bipartisan governors conference in Rhode Island, the CEO of Tesla urged politicians to impose proactive regulations on AI development.

(Image credit: Stephan Savoia/AP)

Stress And Poverty May Explain High Rates Of Dementia In African-Americans

Sun, 07/16/2017 - 1:05am

New research finds that African-Americans who grow up in harsh environments and have many stressful experiences are much more likely to develop Alzheimer's or some other form of dementia.

(Image credit: Leland Bobbe/Getty Images)

Maryam Mirzakhani, Prize-Winning Mathemetician, Dies At 40

Sat, 07/15/2017 - 11:24am

Maryam Mirzakhani was the first woman ever to win the prestigious Fields Medal. She worked at Stanford University, which confirmed her death Saturday.

(Image credit: Stanford University)

NOAA Halts Whale Disentanglement Efforts After Rescuer Dies

Fri, 07/14/2017 - 1:39pm

Boat captain Joe Howlett died on Monday after freeing a right whale that was tangled in fishing gear in Canada's Gulf of St. Lawrence.

(Image credit: International Fund for Animal Welfare/AP)

There's An Amazing New Drug For Multiple Sclerosis. Should I Try It?

Fri, 07/14/2017 - 7:25am

The innovative drug Ocrevus looks like it could be a game-changer for people with MS. But it's very, very expensive. And as with any new medication, the long-term safety risks are unknown.

(Image credit: Katherine Streeter for NPR)

Scientists Teleport A Photon Into Space

Fri, 07/14/2017 - 3:57am

Chinese scientists have reportedly teleported a photon more than 300 miles into space. But what does that actually mean? David Greene talks with physicist Brian Greene to help understand.

Ravens Surprise Scientists By Showing They Can Plan

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 4:54pm

As recently as 10 years ago, humans were thought to be the only species with the ability to plan. Turns out ravens can too, on a par with great apes.

(Image credit: Tom Koerner/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

If It Walks Like An Ant, You Probably Wouldn't Eat It — Or So These Spiders Hope

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 3:45pm

A scientist discovers how some spiders go undercover as a less delicious species to evade predators.

(Image credit: Ian Boyd/Flickr)

Scientists Discover Sneaky Spider That Fools Predators

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 3:35pm

It's a dog eat dog world out there in nature. One way not to get eaten is to look like something else that's not tasty. Now scientists have discovered a spider that fools predators by not only looking like a nasty ant, but actually walking like one.

Afghan Girls Robotics Team Allowed To Enter U.S. For Competition

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 1:29pm

President Trump intervened to find a way to permit the girls entry, after their applications for visas were twice rejected. For the budding scientists, the path to compete has been a long one.

(Image credit: Hoshang Hashimi/AFP/Getty Images)

How Storytelling Can Improve The Care Of People With Alzheimer's

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 10:20am

A former journalist is making sure caregivers know patients' life stories.

(Image credit: Family photo, courtesy of Jay Newton-Small)

No Offense, American Bees, But Your Sperm Isn't Cutting It

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 8:00am

U.S. bees are in trouble, and one of the major threats is a deadly parasite called varroa mite. So researchers are importing sperm from European bees resistant to mites to toughen up America's stock.

(Image credit: Megan Asche/Courtesy of Washington State University)

'Living Drug' That Fights Cancer By Harnessing The Immune System Clears Key Hurdle

Wed, 07/12/2017 - 5:08pm

An advisory panel to the Food and Drug Administration recommends the agency, for the first time, approve a new kind of treatment that uses genetically modified immune cells to attack cancer cells.

(Image credit: Eye of Science/Science Source)

Statue Of Scopes Trial Lawyer Sparks Debate In Tennessee

Wed, 07/12/2017 - 3:30pm

In 1925, the Scopes Trial sparked national debates about creationism and secularism, and put Dayton, Tenn., on the map. Now another debate is happening in Dayton about whether it's appropriate to memorialize the secular side with a statue.

Took The Wrong Medicine By Mistake? Study Finds Such Errors Are On The Rise

Wed, 07/12/2017 - 11:52am

A study analyzing data from poison control centers finds that the rate of serious medication errors outside health care settings doubled between 2000 and 2012.

(Image credit: Gillian Blease/Getty Images)

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