Health and Science News

Subscribe to Health and Science News feed Health and Science News
The latest health and science news. Updates on medicine, healthy living, nutrition, drugs, diet, and advances in science and technology. Subscribe to the Health & Science podcast.
Updated: 19 min 42 sec ago

Forcing People At Vending Machines To Wait Nudges Them To Buy Healthier Snacks

Fri, 03/31/2017 - 11:46am

Buy an unhealthy snack and these vending machines take away 25 seconds of your life you'll never get back. Healthy fare drops instantly. Research suggests this "time tax" helps us make better choices.

(Image credit: M. Spencer Green/AP)

Why The Newly Proposed Sepsis Treatment Needs More Study

Thu, 03/30/2017 - 3:48pm

The bodywide inflammation known as sepsis kills about 300,000 people in U.S. hospitals each year. Promising treatments have come and gone, warn skeptical doctors, who call for rigorous research.

(Image credit: Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Australian Researchers Plan Investigation Into Tasmanian Tiger Sightings

Thu, 03/30/2017 - 3:31pm

NPR's Ari Shapiro interviews James Cook University researcher Sandra Abell, who is leading a search for the Tasmanian Tiger, believed to be extinct until recent sightings surfaced.

Back From The Dead? Reported Sightings Fuel Hope For Return Of Tasmanian Tigers

Thu, 03/30/2017 - 3:31pm

The last known Tasmanian tiger died more than eight decades ago. It has become the stuff of textbook sketches and yellowing photographs. But now, researchers are launching a new search.

(Image credit: Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

A Tiny Spot In Mouse Brains May Explain How Breathing Calms The Mind

Thu, 03/30/2017 - 1:16pm

A cluster of neurons connects breathing and emotion centers in mouse brains, researchers say. If this turns out to be true in humans, it could explain how controlled breathing calms the mind.

(Image credit: laflor/Getty Images/iStockphoto)

A Forgotten Shipwreck Imperils Washington's Oysters

Thu, 03/30/2017 - 10:53am

The sunken Hero, an Antarctic research vessel from the 1960s, is leaking oil into Willapa Bay, where more than half of the state's oysters are grown. And no one knows how to remove it.

(Image credit: Molly Solomon/Oregon Public Broadcasting)

A Surprising Explanation For Why Some Immigrants Excel In Science

Thu, 03/30/2017 - 5:00am

It has to do with language learning, according to a new study from Duke University.

(Image credit: Chris Ayers/Society for Science & the Public)

EPA Says It Will Allow Continued Sale Of Controversial Pesticide

Thu, 03/30/2017 - 4:14am

The EPA is not going ahead with a proposed ban on a pesticide called chlorpyrifos, saying there's still scientific uncertainty over its safety. Environmental groups say it can harm young children.

Fewer Zika-Linked Birth Defects Than Expected

Thu, 03/30/2017 - 4:14am

Scientists expected a surge of severe birth defects in Brazil because of the Zika outbreak. But that didn't happen last year. Researchers are re-examining the link between Zika and birth defects.

Where Levees Fail In California, Nature Can Step In To Nurture Rivers

Wed, 03/29/2017 - 4:20pm

After devastating floods, California is looking to spend billions on dams and levees. Some are calling for a new approach to flood control, one that mimics nature instead of trying to contain it.

(Image credit: Lauren Sommer/KQED)

Launch, Land, Launch — SpaceX Tries Reusing Its Rocket

Wed, 03/29/2017 - 3:48pm

Thursday the private company SpaceX plans on launching a satellite using a rocket that it has launched once before. Reusing equipment could make it cheaper to do business in deep space.

(Image credit: SpaceX)

Fishermen Catch 50 Pound Carp In The Middle Of Los Angeles

Wed, 03/29/2017 - 3:41pm

MacArthur Park in the middle of Los Angles is not the most picturesque location, but it is where members of the California Ghetto Carping Club love to fish. And this week, it's where Eddie Salmeron caught the club's record fish, a 50 pound carp.

Will The EPA Reject A Pesticide, Or Its Own Scientific Evidence?

Wed, 03/29/2017 - 3:02pm

The agency must decide this week whether to ban chlorpyrifos, a pesticide widely used on produce. The EPA thinks it could pose risks to consumers. But its new head made his name fighting such rules.

(Image credit: Jim West/Science Source)

HPV Vaccine Could Protect More People With Fewer Doses, Doctors Insist

Wed, 03/29/2017 - 9:21am

In the U.S., there are about 39,000 cancers associated with the human papillomavirus each year. Doctors say the new HPV vaccine may help reduce the number of cases.

(Image credit: Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images)

Measuring The Impact Of Rolling Back Environmental Regulations

Wed, 03/29/2017 - 4:07am

President Trump's environmental order proposes rolling back regulations. David Greene speaks with John Larsen of the Rhodium Group about the impact those rollbacks could have on emissions levels.

Passengers Take Flight To View Southern Lights

Wed, 03/29/2017 - 4:07am

The Aurora Australis is a display of neon green lights that dance across the southern skies. A plane took off from New Zealand to get a special view.

Scientists Who Want To Study Climate Engineering Shun Trump

Wed, 03/29/2017 - 4:07am

The controversial study of climate engineering — aka deliberately messing with Earth's temperature — was finally starting to regain a measure of respectability. And then came President Trump.

(Image credit: Pixza/Getty Images)

A New Kind Of March Madness Hits Schools

Wed, 03/29/2017 - 3:23am

It's March Mammal Madness, a bracket with real animals facing off in fictional battles. Hundreds of science classes are playing in schools around the country.

(Image credit: Adam Cole/NPR)

Paralyzed Man Uses Thoughts to Control His Own Arm And Hand

Tue, 03/28/2017 - 6:42pm

A spinal injury severed the connection between Bill Kochevar's brain and everything below his shoulders. But technology has given him a new way to control one arm and hand.

(Image credit: Cleveland FES Center)

Mayor Of Wyoming Coal Town Reacts To Trump's Climate Order

Tue, 03/28/2017 - 3:32pm

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Louise Carter-King, mayor of Gillette, Wyo., about the impact that President Trump's executive order loosening regulations on coal will have on the the town.

Pages

©2016 WLRH PUBLIC RADIO

Address

WLRH Public Radio
UAH Campus
John Wright Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899

Get Directions

Phone

LOCAL:
(256) 895-9574

TOLL-FREE:
(800) 239-9574