Health and Science News

Subscribe to Health and Science News feed Health and Science News
The latest health and science news. Updates on medicine, healthy living, nutrition, drugs, diet, and advances in science and technology. Subscribe to the Health & Science podcast.
Updated: 11 min 3 sec ago

A Baby With 3 Genetic Parents Seems Healthy, But Questions Remain

Sat, 04/08/2017 - 4:00am

A baby who was conceived through an experimental procedure designed to prevent a deadly disease appears to be healthy. But some potentially defective DNA remains. Will it affect his health long term?

(Image credit: JGI/Tom Grill/Getty Images/Blend Images)

Michigan's Tart Cherry Orchards Struggle To Cope With Erratic Spring Weather

Fri, 04/07/2017 - 3:31pm

An unpredictable spring this year unnerved tart cherry growers in Michigan, because these cherry trees are especially vulnerable to extreme weather shifts made more likely by climate change.

(Image credit: Peter Payette/Interlochen Public Radio)

Dalia Mogahed: How Does Speaking Up Change Minds?

Fri, 04/07/2017 - 7:59am

After 9/11, Dalia Mogahed saw an increase in negative perceptions of Muslims in the media, so she made it her job to speak up for her faith and fight prejudice with better understanding.

(Image credit: Bret Hartman/TED)

Adam Galinksy: What Drives Us To Speak Up?

Fri, 04/07/2017 - 7:59am

Social psychologist Adam Galinsky studies why it's so daunting to speak up — and what can help. He says the most powerful factor that compels us to take that risk is "moral conviction."

(Image credit: Dian Lofton/TEDxNewYork)

James Hansen: What Makes A Scientist Take A Stand?

Fri, 04/07/2017 - 7:59am

When James Hansen spoke up about climate change in the 1980s, he risked the loss of his job and reputation. But, he says, it was worth it — because he could not be silent about something so important.

(Image credit: James Duncan Davidson/TED)

Bison Or Brian? From A Calorie Perspective, Cannibalism Didn't Pay For Paleo Humans

Thu, 04/06/2017 - 3:52pm

Archaeological records show ancient humans sometimes ate each other. A new study suggests that hunting and eating other humans cost too much effort to be a regular thing. So why'd they do it?

(Image credit: Publiphoto/Science Source)

In Giant Virus Genes, Hints About Their Mysterious Origin

Thu, 04/06/2017 - 1:02pm

They're the Godzillas of the virus world, pushing the limit of what is considered alive. Researchers are trying to figure out where they came from. (And no, they aren't known to make people sick.)

(Image credit: Didier Raoult/Science Source)

How Flawed Science Is Undermining Good Medicine

Thu, 04/06/2017 - 4:08am

U.S. taxpayers pay $30 billion a year to fund biomedical research aimed at finding better treatments. But competition for scarce funding and tenure may be prompting some scientists to cut corners.

(Image credit: Mick Wiggins/Ikon Images/Getty Images)

Ex-Secretary Of State Advocates Causes Not Key On Modern Republic Agenda

Wed, 04/05/2017 - 3:33pm

James Baker--who served in two Republican White Houses--is writing about causes that don't figure prominently on the modern Republican agenda. He's advocating a global ban on the sale of ivory.

NASA's Cassini Begins Its Final Mission Before Self-Destruction

Wed, 04/05/2017 - 3:33pm

NASA's Cassini's spacecraft will begin the final stages of its 20-year mission to Saturn before diving into the planet and ending its lengthy stretch orbiting the planet.

Ex-Secretary Of State Advocates Causes Not Key In Modern Republican Agenda

Wed, 04/05/2017 - 3:33pm

James Baker, who served in two Republican White Houses, is writing about causes that don't figure prominently in the modern Republican agenda. He's advocating a global ban on the sale of ivory.

The Race To Fish Slows Down. Why That's Good For Fish, Fishermen And Diners

Wed, 04/05/2017 - 12:17pm

Catch shares allot fishermen a portion of the catch in advance, in hopes of keeping them from racing each other to sea, sometimes in risky climes. They're controversial. They also work, a study finds.

(Image credit: Courtesy of John Rae)

Experts Suspect Nerve Agent Was Used In Syrian Attack

Wed, 04/05/2017 - 11:47am

An attack on a rebel-held region of Syria on Tuesday has killed dozens of people. Video and eyewitness reports suggest powerful chemical weapons are responsible.

(Image credit: IHA via AP)

Do U.S. Troops Risk Brain Injury When They Fire Heavy Weapons?

Wed, 04/05/2017 - 5:02am

Some modern shoulder-fired weapons produce blast waves powerful enough to rattle the brain. A $30 million study aims to help the military figure out how much blast exposure, over time, is too much.

(Image credit: Spc. Justin Young/U.S. Department of Defense/DVIDS)

VIDEO: Badger Burying A Cow Surprises Scientists

Tue, 04/04/2017 - 3:33pm

The researchers say it's the first time an American badger has been documented burying an animal larger than itself. It worked for five days and nights to accomplish the unexpected feat.

(Image credit: Courtesy Evan Buechley)

Sound Matters: Sex And Death In The Rain Forest

Tue, 04/04/2017 - 1:08pm

Scientists eavesdropping in trees have decoded a high stakes game of hide and seek. Katydids rely on ultrasound to find mates and listen for bats, which use ultrasound to find the bugs, and eat them.

(Image credit: Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images)

Taking Shortcuts In Drug Testing Can Put Patients At Risk

Tue, 04/04/2017 - 11:42am

Researchers use intermediate endpoints like how a drug lowers cholesterol to get a quick sense of whether the drug might improve health. But those shortcuts often don't show true benefits and harms.

(Image credit: Jamel Akib/Ikon Images/Getty Images)

Trump Team Urges Skimpier Health Plans To Lure More People To Buy Insurance

Tue, 04/04/2017 - 4:00am

A rule proposed by the Trump administration would likely raise the deductibles and copays of new policies sold on the exchanges, starting next fall. Monthly premiums would likely be cheaper.

(Image credit: John Holcroft/Ikon Images/Getty Images)

Inside The Hole: What Happens To The Mind In Isolation?

Mon, 04/03/2017 - 8:00pm

The use of solitary confinement in prisons has grown since the 1970s. Criminologist Keramet Reiter talks with us about the psychological effects that long-term isolation has on our minds.

(Image credit: Mark Boster/LA Times via Getty Images)

The Taste Of Wine Isn't All In Your Head, But Your Brain Sure Helps

Mon, 04/03/2017 - 2:13pm

Savoring the flavor of wine activates more gray matter than solving a complex math problem, according to neuroscientist Gordon Shepherd. His new book, Neurenology, explores your brain on wine.

(Image credit: Alex Reynolds/NPR)

Pages

©2016 WLRH PUBLIC RADIO

Address

WLRH Public Radio
UAH Campus
John Wright Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899

Get Directions

Phone

LOCAL:
(256) 895-9574

TOLL-FREE:
(800) 239-9574