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The recent killings of unarmed black men by police have inspired a Brooklyn theater company to stage new readings of dramas written in the early 1900s about the lynching of African-Americans.

Most smartphones have a built-in FM chip. But whether or not it's activated is in the hands of the mobile carriers, who profit when you stream radio. The broadcast industry is pushing to change this.

Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi has a much better relationship with the U.S. than his predecessor. But he's still struggling to entrench his position in Iraq and defeat the Islamic State.

China says 57 countries have signed on as members of the new Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, but the U.S. is not among them. Some analysts say the bank is a sign of diminished U.S. power.

Research shows the mutual gazing between pooches and people spurs release of a "trust hormone" in both. The results suggest dogs really may love us back.

Two years ago, Israel ended with great fanfare a program that brought tens of thousands of Ethiopian Jews to Israel. But many are in limbo, separated from family, the result of stricter religious law.

President Park Geun-hye has pledged to salvage the ferry, which capsized and sank, killing 304 people — most of them students. The rescue effort was widely viewed as bungled.

Virginia found 1-in-5 of its touchscreen machines vulnerable to attack with passwords as easy as "abcde." As voting equipment ages, new concerns are being raised.

Golf courses are water hogs, and that thirst is especially notable as California's drought grows in severity. At Pelican Hill, a top golf course near Los Angeles, water conservation is an obsession.

Britain forced thousands off Diego Garcia, a remote Indian Ocean island, in the '70s to make way for a U.S. military base. For 40 years residents have fought to return. Now they have a growing chance.

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