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The sediment and muddy freshwater that spilled into these Texas bodies of water are causing problems for the shipping and oyster industries.

To increase populations of the endangered black-footed ferret, scientists aim to save prairie dogs, a main food source. The biologists use drones and medicated peanut butter-flavored pellets to do it.

Venezuelans are suffering under increasing shortages of food, medicine, and other basics. But growing anger from this has not translated into greater success at the ballot box for the opposition.

President Trump appears at the grand opening of the Museum of Mississippi History and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum even as the NAACP and civil rights activists say his presence is an insult.

The ongoing SoCal wildfires have burned more than 100,000 acres, forced thousands of people to evacuate, and destroyed hundreds of structures. Cal Fire says there is no end in sight.

The Wall Street Journal announced that it would consider how it uses the term "millennial." Linguist Ben Zimmer weighs in on whether this term has painted a whole generation with too broad a brush.

James Han Mattson's debut book, inspired by the real-life suicide of an outed young man, treats the Internet as both lifeline and paper trail of a tormented, small-town adolescence.

Bayou water and sewage flooded the city's opera, ballet, and theater companies, ruining wigs, costumes and props. Losses and costs to rebuild may total more than $60 million.

In 1912, white mobs set fire to black churches and black-owned businesses. Author Patrick Phillips revisits the incident in his book, Blood at the Root. Originally broadcast Sept. 15, 2016.

Insurgents attacked U.N. peacekeepers in eastern Congo, killing 14 and wounding scores more. It was the deadliest attack on U.N. peacekeepers in recent memory.

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