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Donald Trump is rising in the polls and is getting all the attention when he delivers controversial speeches. A look at how the other candidates, and the Republican establishment, are responding.

Scientists say they can now download signals from your brain — and translate them back into a picture that you saw.The images aren't crystal clear. But you can make out what's going on.

Minecraft can be more social and creative than watching TV. But kids' drive to play for hours on end can strain recommended limits on screen time. What's a mother to do?

Competition was fierce at the Rubik's Cube world championship in Brazil. There was a 4-year-old and a category for those who do it with their feet. The overall winner needed less than 6 seconds.

A shark attacks a surfer, but he survives unscathed.

Basketball is the most popular sport among both boys and girls, but many women end up dropping the game in adulthood, even though they still love it. Injuries, work and family are three reasons why.

The old U.S. Embassy in Havana has a storied past. The Cubans long described it as a nest of spies. Today the building again becomes an embassy as the U.S. and Cuba formally restore relations.

Even as other channels tried to adapt to a new TV landscape, many considered ESPN impervious for one reason: People want to watch sports live. But ESPN has shed 3.2 million subscribers since May 2014.

By targeting the process that creates toxic clumps of protein in brain cells, scientists hope to help not just Alzheimer's patients, but perhaps also people with Lewy Body dementia and Parkinson's.

The Huffington Post says it won't cover Donald Trump as a political story, despite his surge in the polls. NPR's Rachel Martin talks with The New York Times' Jeremy Peters about Trump's popularity.

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