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As leader of the women's network 85 Broads, Sallie Krawcheck lobbies for better gender equality in boardrooms. She also says women need to negotiate tougher to get there.

Patients undergoing chemotherapy need to eat to stay strong. But the drugs can cause nausea and damage taste buds. New flavors and spices can help a lot, a chef says.

With new measles outbreaks in Southern California, New York and British Columbia, vaccinating — and not vaccinating — is still an area of great concern.

The first Rwandan genocide trial to take place in France sent a man to prison for 25 years last month. Dafroza Gauthier and her organization helped make that conviction possible.

A key moment in the butchery occurred at the Ecole Technique Officielle. Thousands of Tutsis sheltering there were left to fight for survival after the school was abandoned by Belgian peacekeepers.

Attendees at the annual We Robot conference are peering into the future, pondering questions like, do robots have rights? What kinds of laws do we need to regulate unmanned drones?

The Wildlife Service mission is to mitigate conflict between humans and wildlife. But critics, including members of Congress, say the agency uses cruel methods and is not transparent enough.

Women made up 70 percent of Rwanda's population after the genocide in 1994. They joined politics in unprecedented numbers, helping to form a more equitable society. Still, there's much more to do.

Matthiessen was a spy, a naturalist, a well-regarded activist and a three-time winner of the National Book Award — for both fiction and nonfiction. He died of acute myeloid leukemia.

A court in Japan recently released Iwao Hakamada, thought to be the world's longest-serving death row inmate. NPR's Rachel Martin talks with David Johnson, an expert on Japan's legal system.

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