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Russian state television said that U.S. intelligence accusations of Vladimir Putin ordering election meddling are nothing new.

The sheriff's office in Oconee County, Ga., caught a runaway llama, after a caller reported that a "baby camel" had escaped. Chief Deputy Lee Weems talks about the county's loose llama problem.

In this week's sports roundup: The start of NFL playoffs, the fate of running back Joe Mixon, who was caught on video punching a woman in 2014, and a 105-year-old Frenchman still on his bike.

Lawmakers have lots of questions for Donald Trump's pick for secretary of state, Rex Tillerson. The former ExxonMobil CEO has done business around the world, including with Russian President Putin.

Research about senior citizens by the University of California, San Francisco finds people who are lonely have a higher mortality rate. Companionship may be more important than income or health.

Jason Lewis was a conservative radio host in Minnesota and was recently elected to represent his state in the U.S. House of Representatives. He talks about his legislative priorities.

A shooting at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport left five people dead, and raises new questions about airport security. Aviation security expert Jeff Price explains.

Syracuse University Professor Corey Takahashi offers his commentary on the challenge of teaching students who, instead of wanting to be writers or filmmakers, aspire to be online "influencers."

The American chestnut tree used to make up a quarter of the forests in the eastern U.S., but disease decimated these trees in the last century. Now there's an effort to restore the American chestnut.

Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York says he is open to compromise but wants to hold a hard line on protecting his party's priorities. And he is going to use the incoming president's words against him.

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