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A school shooting in rural New Mexico has opened a debate over whether teachers in schools in the town of Aztec should be armed.

Two filmmakers from Amarillo, Texas, released their debut film about the death of a young man in the late '90s after a jocks versus punks brawl that got widespread national attention and exposed deep divisions in the city. The film, Bomb City, carries a nickname for Amarillo, the only city in the country with a nuclear assembly plant.

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May is under pressure to place sanctions on Russia, following the poisoning of a former Russian spy, who was living in exile in the western city of Salisbury.

President Trump's school safety agenda encourages more states to adopt "risk protection orders." These allow law enforcement to temporarily seize guns from people judged dangerous to themselves or others.

Rania Abouzeid has been covering Syria since 2011 — despite the fact that she's been called a spy, placed on wanted lists by Syrian intelligence and banned from entering the country.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has intervened in two cases that could have big implications for people who come to the U.S. and seek asylum.

While some EU leaders seek unity over budgets and refugee policies, member states Poland and Hungary are building a unified front to thwart the bloc's plans.

As early as your mid-40s, especially if you're sedentary, your heart muscle can show signs of aging, losing its youthful elasticity and power. But moderately strenuous exercise can change that.

The fund was created to help defray the legal costs for women who've been sexually harassed. It's kind of like a matchmaking service that pairs alleged victims with local attorneys.

Native American tribal members in the Pacific Northwest host an annual karaoke contest to keep their indigenous language, Salish, alive.

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