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Arrests and other intimidation have kept critics from being able to organize and speak out. The interim government's message: If you're really an Egyptian than you'll vote yes. Opponents say the new constitution further enshrines the military's role in Egyptian life.

Even retailers that invest heavily in sophisticated security systems are seeing new vulnerabilities from rogue hackers who are buying software tools on the black market.

The midterm congressional elections are 10 months away. But some political and ideological organizations are already buying ads to criticize incumbents they hope to take down in November, like Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen.

A race is on to save Britain's beloved crimson phone booth, threatened not by habitat loss or climate change, but by the ubiquity of cell phones. The country had 92,000 payphones in 2002; now, it has just 48,000. But devotees are finding new uses for the booths.

It's logical to try to connect the uninsured patients in emergency rooms with options for health coverage. But consumer confusion, skepticism and illness are hurdles to overcome for outreach workers inside hospitals.

Robert Goins was tracing his genealogy when he found his ancestors' names listed among livestock and farm implements in a plantation ledger. With that painful discovery, he kept digging until he found a very different story: that of a great-great-great grandfather who lived as a freeman.

West Virginia officials told residents Monday to flush out their home water systems before using the tap water again, and the ban on the water persists in some places. Tests at the affected water treatment plant show almost no contamination. However, some toxicologists say, the spill shows how little is known about many chemicals in common use.

In Little Rock, Ark., a federal judge approved a settlement that brings an end to a landmark school desegregation case. The case dates back to 1957, when nine black students integrated Central High School, which up until that point was all-white. But after 60 years of desegregation efforts, are the classes really integrated?

A new study adds to the evidence that among everyday coffee drinkers, the old wives' tale that coffee will lead to dehydration is really just that: a tale. Another study found that caffeine may help to consolidate memories in the short term, but may not help retrieve old memories.

Some analysts say that Nintendo's days are numbered because sales of its new console, Wii U, have been lackluster. But since Nintendo still offers some of the most popular game franchises, the love of Zelda and Mario may keep the company going for a long time.

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