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Most polls show Hillary Clinton beating Bernie Sanders soundly in the state's upcoming primary, due to overwhelming black support. But many young black voters are turning lukewarm on Clinton.

Facebook's free Internet service was banned in India on the basis of net neutrality this week. Internet providers, regulators say, should not be allowed "to shape the users' Internet experience."

Decades ago, Pakistan International Airlines was a trendy airline whose flight attendants wore Pierre Cardin uniforms. These days the national carrier is $3 billion in debt and fighting privatization.

The 8-inch insect nearly went extinct when hungry rats overran its island. But Melbourne scientists found a few in 2001 and started a thriving colony. Now the San Diego Zoo is hatching them, too.

Shiite-majority Iran is home to millions of Sunnis, including the Sunni imam who opened his door to NPR's Steve Inskeep in Tehran. "We live together nicely," he insists. But he must speak with care.

Americans of all ages are tossing away the keys and giving up their driver's licenses, a new study shows. Cars are being replaced by bikes, public transit and ride-hailing services.

A year after a gunman killed 3 young Muslim-Americans in North Carolina, many in the local Muslim community has responded by being more vocal and visible around issues of faith.

State and city officials knew about problems with Flint's water even as they encouraged people to keep using it. Locals are disillusioned, and angry, and rebuilding that trust will be challenging.

A few years ago, glass bottles with handwritten messages inside started washing up along the New England coast. They're the work of Ken Baker. One recently found its way to Ireland.

Sameh Hassan Shoukry, Egypt's foreign minister, speaks with NPR's David Greene about the state of democracy and human rights in his country.

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