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After decades of hope and disappointment, doctors have now been able to treat several different types of genetic conditions by giving each patient a healthy version of their defective gene.

After years of budget and political pressure, some climate scientists are changing the way they describe their research, and avoiding the term "climate change."

According to The Washington Post, a woman approached the paper with a dramatic and fake story about U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore appears to be part of a sting operation. She was later seen entering the office of Project Veritas, an outfit that produces videos designed to discredit mainstream media outlets as well as left-leaning activist groups.

Jerome Powell's confirmation hearing went smoothly, putting him closer to being confirmed as the Federal Reserve's next chairman. He suggested he'll continue the policies pursued under Janet Yellen.

The first man to face justice over the deadly 2012 attack on a U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi Libya was found guilty today by a federal jury in Washington, D.C. Ahmed Abu Khatallah was convicted on terrorism charges, but he was acquitted on the most serious charges he faced — murder.

Last year, every graduating senior at Ballou High School got into college. A WAMU and NPR investigation shows that many of those students missed more than a month of school and struggled academically.

For decades, Canadian law enforcement — including the Royal Canadian Mounted Police — worked aggressively to purge members of the LGTBQ community from government positions and the military. On Tuesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau formally apologized for the policy that didn't end until the 1990s.

North Korea fired what the Pentagon says was an intercontinental ballistic missile, the third this year. The missile flew about 1,000 km, passing over the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido and landing in the Pacific Ocean.

Pope Francis is in Myanmar where he voiced support for ethnic minorities, but did not mention the persecuted Muslim Rohingya by name. This, in comments to leader Aung San Suu Kyi, disappointed rights activists seeking support for the hundreds of thousands of Rohingya who have fled violence.

Dr. Henry Jay Przybylo specializes in pediatric anesthesiology and treats about 1,000 children a year, including premature babies. His new memoir is called Counting Backwards.




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