Listen to NPR Stories Online

The 2,073-foot-tall Shanghai Tower will be the world's second-tallest building when it opens this year. More than just a skyscraper, it's a symbol of Shanghai's — and China's — soaring ambitions.

Women who choose to raise their children out of wedlock are so rare in South Korean society that they face social ostracization, job losses and active encouragement to adopt out their kids.

Older Palestinians can enter Israel without prior authorization; 100 Palestinian doctors are now permitted to drive to work. An Israeli officer describes these modest policy changes as an experiment.

It's a nightmarish job: No exercise or fresh air and little food and sleep for days at a time, all in an effort to persuade 200 countries to save Earth's climate and the planet. Can they do it?

Each year more than 12 million Americans go to the doctor because of severe, chronic headaches. Many are sent for expensive tests. Researchers say all this testing isn't doing people much good.

Self-driving cars are hot news, with Google and others showing off their latest innovations. Now expand that concept from four to 18 wheels, and you get the Freightliner Inspiration.

Bill Clinton won Arkansas twice when he ran for president. The state's politics have taken a dramatic turn to the right since, but some in his hometown like the idea of Clinton as first gentleman.

The Harlem Children's Zone Baby College program offers classes and supplies to expectant parents and those with kids up to age 3. It also helps create a vital sense of community.

Casualties for Soviet Russia far exceeded other allies arrayed against the Nazis. An estimated 24 million soldiers and civilians were killed.

Hillary Clinton brought her presidential campaign to Rancho High School in Las Vegas this week. It's a school full of DREAMers with big plans for the future, and they aren't afraid of politics.

Pages

©2015 WLRH PUBLIC RADIO

Address

WLRH Public Radio
UAH Campus
John Wright Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899

Get Directions

Phone

LOCAL:
(256) 895-9574

TOLL-FREE:
(800) 239-9574