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Drugmakers have brought almost 450 orphan drugs to market and collected rich incentives by doing so. But nearly a third of the medicines aren't new or were repurposed many times for financial gain.

In the 1950s and '60s, payola scandals led to Congressional investigations. Though today's tactics are more nuanced than handing a DJ a briefcase full of money, pay for play is still alive and well.

In one community where many emigrated from harsh nations, the president-elect's rhetoric brings worries of renewed repression. Cabinet nominees' opposition to a registry hasn't erased those concerns.

Cernan flew in space three times, took the second American spacewalk, and was just as thrilled to walk on the moon as if he had been the first to do it.

More than a hundred female federal inmates, sentenced to long-term prison, have instead been stuck for years in a New York detention center where conditions violate international standards.

If your mom had to run though the name of everyone in the family, including the dog, before hitting yours, it's probably because you're all in a mental folder labeled "loved ones."

Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf is about to lose an iceberg the size of Delaware. Scientists gathering in the U.K. are scratching their heads about why it's cracking off.

Journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones says school segregation will continue to exist in America "as long as individual parents continue to make choices that only benefit their own children."

Jay Y. Lee, the de facto head of Samsung Electronics, is accused of paying tens of millions of dollars in bribes to a confidant of President Park Geun-hye in a growing influence-peddling scandal.

Next week the Supreme Court will hear arguments for Lee v. Tam, which is a First Amendment case against the U.S. Patent and Trademark office, brought by the rock band The Slants.

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