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A decision on the Clean Power Plan could be long in coming — meaning that the rules' fate might not be determined before a new presidential administration comes into power in 2017.

Pop-up dining experiences are cropping up across the country. While diners savor an exclusive meal, chefs get to try out recipes and gauge the local market for their food before opening a restaurant.

Deep in the woods of New Hampshire, 20 inmates are engaged in a fierce chess tournament in a secluded prison. The prize may be just a paper certificate, but even then, winning means a lot.

A dozen congregations are harboring immigrants facing deportation. It echoes the sanctuary movement of the 1980s, when hundreds of churches sheltered Central Americans escaping war and violence.

Though Zika was discovered in 1947, few scientists since had studied the virus. Now, while some check its genes, others turn to placental cells for clues to any link between Zika and birth defects.

The nets that ensnare the giant totoaba fish also trap and kill the world's smallest and rarest mammal: a porpoise called the vaquita.

The federal health law is putting farmers in a tough spot. Many contractors supplying workers have to offer health coverage. Insurance is costly, and contractors worry about immigration fallout.

For the first time, companies can apply to set up fish farms in U.S. federal waters. The government says the move will help reduce American dependence on foreign seafood and improve security.

For the first time, CBS put the full Super Bowl, with ads, online and claimed record viewership. But StreamingMedia.com's Dan Rayburn says the decision to stream is getting too much hype.

For Flint resident Jeneyah McDonald, using bottled water for everything has become an onerous but necessary routine. Still, she worries about the effects that toxic tap water will have on her sons.

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