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"Wherever you walk around, there goes a cop," says one resident, who is happy with the changes in the city. But some critics still see evidence of old-school police tactics that they say don't work.

Midwestern and Southwestern states struggle with an influx of heroin being sold for cheap by Mexican cartels. In one community, a spike in heroin-related deaths has everyone on high alert.

The ocean's tiniest inhabitants — including bacteria, plankton, krill — are food for most everything that swims or floats. Now, scientists have completed a count of this vast and diverse hidden world.

Steve Cook, who heads the Midwest Outlaw Motorcycle Gang Investigators Association, tells NPR that soldiers returning from World War II formed biker gangs, which became infamous during a 1947 riot.

Any day now, the FDA could announce a final rule aimed at removing much of the remaining trans fats out of the food supply. It could amount to a near ban on the fats, which wreak cardiovascular havoc.

China is rolling out an ambitious soccer program. President Xi Jinping is reported to be a big fan who wants China to win a World Cup. Critics say there's too much emphasis on quick results.

In veiled conversations, some doctors may explain to dying patients how to hasten death. But overwhelmed families are left with profound questions and the feeling that no one can answer them.

Genetically, at least, not that much has changed in the billion years since you two last shared a relative. Roughly half the 500 genes yeast need for life are interchangeable with the human versions.

Late Show host David Letterman said goodbye Wednesday night with his trademark self-deprecating sarcasm. He left as he had arrived: with a hilarious show made on his own terms.

The World Health Organization isn't ready for the next pandemic or international health crisis, so the agency's leader is calling for major reforms. But will the changes be enough?




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