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The armed occupiers of a federal wildlife refuge have been free to come and go. Deadly government raids in the 1990s, such as Waco and Ruby Ridge, means there's less appetite for force these days.

Slovakia has never been particularly welcoming to migrants and it resisted the most recent influx to Europe. Those who came a generation ago say they are still often seen as outsiders.

Some in the community of Burns, Ore., welcome the attention on long-running conflict between ranchers and the federal government. Others question the out-of-town militants' tactics and goals.

Immigration agents are rounding up Central American families who entered the U.S. illegally within the past two years. They are mainly mothers with children whose asylum claims have been rejected.

Obama cried after he remembered the children who were killed by a mass shooter in Newtown, Conn. "Every time I think about those kids, it makes me mad," he said.

When it comes to dam safety, human eyes are still one of the best tools to recognize problems — so in some areas, workers live in remote locations to watch over the water supply.

Greater access to child care is central to Japan's "womenomics" policy. The hope is that more day care will mean more women remain in the workforce after they become mothers.

Moira Demos and Laura Ricciardi were film students when they started working on their 10-part Netflix series about Steven Avery. "We had no money, but what we did have was time," Demos says.

Service dogs help veterans with physical disabilities, and there's increased interest in using dogs for symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, too. A study is underway to see whether that helps.

As part of a new partnership, the two companies also announced that they're rolling out a service for the human drivers of today to rent vehicles, rather than use their own.

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