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The death of SeaWorld trainer Dawn Brancheau has been the catalyst for major changes in how the theme park handles its killer whales. The whale responsible for Brancheau's death, has died in Orlando.

Washington Post sports writer Sally Jenkins talks about about sexual assault accusations against University of Minnesota football players, and the complexity of judging these cases.

Adriano Espaillat, the first Dominican American congressman, hopes his background as a formerly undocumented immigrant will help find him common ground with his colleagues on immigration policy.

New research suggests that scientific publications may be overlooked in non-English speaking countries. NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks about the issue with Princeton Professor Michael Gordin.

Wednesday will be a busy day on Capitol Hill with confirmation hearings and a Trump press conference. Questions about Russia's interference in the U.S. election will likely be at the center of both.

Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson and Lisa Morrison Butler, Chicago's Commissioner of the Department of Family and Support Services, discuss the recent spike of violence in the city.

Illinois Sen. Richard Durbin talks about Chicago after more than 700 homicides in 2016. He says there's not one solution, but the city does need federal funds to grow the police force.

Congressman Danny Davis is a Democrat representing Illinois's 7th District, which includes some Chicago neighborhoods hardest hit by gun violence. His own grandson was shot and killed last November.

Chicago saw a record number of murders in 2016. With more than 700 homicides, there is more than one issue that led to this problem.

Researchers Andrew Papachristos and Gary Slutkin have started to look at gun violence as a public health epidemic, and how to take a holistic approach and reinterpret the problem.

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