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The American chestnut tree used to make up a quarter of the forests in the eastern U.S., but disease decimated these trees in the last century. Now there's an effort to restore the American chestnut.

Cremation rates in the U.S. have nearly doubled over the past 15 years. Barbara Kemmis, executive director of the Cremation Association of North America, discusses reasons for the increase.

Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York says he is open to compromise but wants to hold a hard line on protecting his party's priorities. And he is going to use the incoming president's words against him.

In her last speech at the White House, first lady Michelle Obama offers a hopeful and inclusive message to young people, including some who may feel snubbed by the incoming Trump administration.

Some analysts say any involvement by President-elect Trump in a project, even if just his name, can create a conflict of interest, complicating national security, foreign policy or economic concerns.

When the communist system in Russia came crashing down 25 years ago, many Russians hoped their country would become a democracy. But increasingly, democrats are choosing political exile.

Alabama's historically black Talladega College has accepted an invitation for its band to march in the parade which follows Donald Trump's inauguration. But the decision did not come easily.

In an interview with NPR's David Greene, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders criticized the Democratic Party for not listening to the needs of everyday Americans.

A poll finds that 75 percent wants Congress to either leave the law alone or wait to repeal it until they have a new law. For most people, controlling high health care costs is top priority.

They went on strike a month ago, asking for a raise and better training and equipment. So far the government hasn't met their demands.

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