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Personal data of at least 18 million federal workers may have been accessed via the OPM computer system. Some officials quietly blame China; others want to avoid upsetting this major trade partner.

The president's proposal would make 5 million more Americans eligible for overtime pay. But the changes don't mean that employers will pay more.

Research on the psychological effects of racism, especially on people of color, is still in the early stages. But psychologists warn that events like the Charleston shooting can cause serious stress.

Adam Liptak of The New York Times discusses the court's most recent session and says the rulings reveal deep philosophical differences regarding the role of judges and the Constitution.

Employers added 223,000 jobs in June, and the unemployment rate fell to 5.3 percent. But wage growth was flat, and the drop in the unemployment rate had a lot to do with people leaving the workforce.

The oil giant BP has reached an $18.7 billion settlement with Gulf states and the federal government over the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico — the worst in U.S. history.

The Islamic State is a Sunni Muslim group. Yet many Sunnis have abandoned their homes and fled areas where ISIS has taken over in Iraq. But that doesn't mean Shiites welcome them with open arms.

Federal grant money is flowing to skills training programs for ex-offenders. But aid will be successful only if employers are willing to hire them. That's where state re-entry programs show promise.

Economists surveyed by Reuters are predicting that employers added about 230,000 jobs to their payrolls in June. That's less than the month before but still a pretty strong showing.

Aspiring doctors at the University of Chicago are learning how to teach patients about healthy eating. Nutrition advocates say this kind of training is critical to fighting obesity and diabetes.




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