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Chef Eric Ziebold discusses the high-stakes world of luxe cuisine in the wake of the death of Benoit Violier, a French Swiss chef who many said was the best in the world.

A mall real estate executive let slip that Amazon plans to build up to 400 walk-in stores. Analysts were skeptical, and now the executive says his comment wasn't intended to represent Amazon's plans.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is involved on nearly every front, from diagnostics to the study of a possible link to microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome.

To reduce the number of foreign workers, some of those making less than $50,000 won't qualify to stay in Britain beyond April. Critics say the deal would cause labor shortages.

NPR's Robert Siegel spoke with Joe McQuaid, publisher of the largest New Hampshire newspaper, the Union Leader. The conservative paper endorsed Gov. Chris Christie, much to the ire of Donald Trump.

So-called senescent cells no longer divide, but they secrete a mixture of chemicals that can trigger inflammation, which is involved in many age-related disorders. What if the cells were removed?

Intel is revealing more details about its diversity goals — the ones the chipmaker has met and failed to meet — than any other Silicon Valley giant to date.

Five people in Hong Kong's book industry disappeared. All were linked to books forbidden in mainland China. Here's one bookseller who says he has no plans to remove the "banned" works.

Dick DeGuerin has handled a range of difficult, high-profile cases, from Tom DeLay to David Koresh. Now his longtime client, Durst — subject of HBO's The Jinx — is accused of murder ... again.

Before it does damage, an earthquake sends out a "P wave" that scientists use to find location and size. The U.S. quake warning system under development on the West Coast is built around the P wave.

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