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Increasingly, privately owned sports teams aren't just asking for newer, fancier digs. They're also asking the public to pay half — or more — of the bill.

Human rights groups and Western governments have criticized the bill since it was first introduced in 2009. Uganda's president must still sign the measure, which has widespread support.

Many neighborhoods in Detroit are in the dark — not because of a power outage but because fewer than half of the city's 88,000 streetlights actually work. A bankruptcy judge recently approved $60 million in bonds to begin to repair them, but that means the city will have to take on a new debt.

After the Obama administration announced that Americans who recently had their health insurance canceled can buy "catastrophic policies," the insurance industry said the change will cause more confusion.

Credit card companies routinely flag or block suspicious charges as they happen. Yet under Medicare, a convoluted and poorly managed system for catching fraud allows costly scams for prescription drugs to slide by. The federal government has done little to stop the fraud, an investigation by ProPublica found.

The Daily Show's Jon Stewart recently ranted against a culinary signature of Chicago: "Deep dish pizza is not only not better than New York pizza — it's not pizza," said Stewart, calling it "tomato soup in a bread bowl." Some Chicagoans protested. Others turned to their thin-crust pie, and took another bite.

Yelitza Castro cooks for homeless men every other Saturday night. But "you don't make us feel homeless," says Willie Davis, who has partaken in many of the meals. Before he met Yelitza, he says, he had almost given up, but now he has his own place.

Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, was sent to try to stem the growing violence that has gripped the country since Muslim rebels toppled the government in March. Christians and Muslims, who once peacefully co-existed there, are now living in a nation on the brink of genocide.

Salinas, Calif., is just an hour from Silicon Valley, but production at many local lettuce farms is decidedly low-tech. City officials here decided it's time for an upgrade — and have hired a venture capital firm to help Salinas transition into a high-tech agricultural hub.

The Air Force on Thursday destroyed the last B-52 bomber required under the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty with Russia. A crew used a circular saw to cut through the plane's aluminum skin, the tail section separating from the fuselage with a loud thunk and officially rendering the bomber useless.

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