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After six weeks of training, people could memorize twice as much. Areas of the brain had begun communicating in new ways — a lot like what happens inside the heads of world memory champions.

Some health experts worry about what this trend means for chronic disease linked to obesity. Others see an upside: Diets often fail, but a healthy body image can lead to healthy outcomes.

In 2011, Alabama passed what was considered the nation's strictest immigration law. Much of it was later struck down. Now, it offers a snapshot into the challenges ahead for the Trump administration.

To show the economic importance of women, organizers are encouraging them to take the day off from paid and unpaid labor and not to shop — except at women and minority owned and small businesses.

Since Attorney General Jeff Sessions has recused himself from any possible investigation into the Trump campaign and Russia, Rod Rosenstein would have to pick up the task if confirmed.

The story of how that population grew so large is a long one that's mostly about Mexico, and full of unintended consequences.

President Trump has said immigration agents are singling out "bad ones" for deportation. So some Houstonians are asking why they took Piro Garcia, a Guatemalan who became an immigrant success story.

A goal for many Republicans is to cut federal funding for health services at Planned Parenthood and divert those funds to public health centers. How ready are those centers to pick up that work?

Author Norman Ohler says that Adolf Hitler's drug abuse increased "significantly" from the fall of 1941 until winter of 1944: "Hitler needed those highs to substitute [for] his natural charisma."

New research finds eating soy milk, edamame and tofu does not have harmful effects for women with breast cancer, as some have worried. In fact, for some women, soy consumption was tied to longer life.

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