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America's first transcontinental railroad was completed with a golden spike 145 years ago. Thousands of Chinese workers helped build it, but their faces were left out of photos from that historic day.

As testing for doping in sports becomes more sophisticated, so do the drugs. Looking at the recent history of cycling can make you wonder how many cheaters continue to slip by undetected.

Heads Up Football is leading hundreds of training sessions across the country to teach kids a safer stance to avoid head injury. But in the heat of the game, will they forget and hit headfirst?

Republicans are using fewer facts and more emotion in campaign advertising in an effort to connect with women's hearts, and their votes. But for every rule, there is at least one exception.

Congress has ordered the FAA to create new rules to safely integrate drones into U.S. airspace by 2015, but North Dakota's farmers aren't waiting.

Chinese characters don't readily work with the English-centric Internet. The New Republic's Chris Beam tells NPR's Scott Simon that the Chinese use numbers that when pronounced, sound like words.

As state-run TV cheers Vladimir Putin, cable providers have dropped Russia's last independent channel. NPR's Scott Simon interviews the editor of Dozhd TV about its struggles to stay on the air.

Mexican civilians in Michoacan State have taken up arms to fight the murderous Knights Templar cartel. Saturday is the deadline for vigilantes to register their weapons with the police.

The U.S. is advising Nigeria in the search for the girls kidnapped by Boko Haram. But Africa expert Paul Lubeck tells NPR's Scott Simon he doubts the Nigerian government can make good use of the aid.

Sunday's referendum in eastern Ukraine comes as fierce battles are waged in the port city of Mariupol. A vote for independence may calm tensions, but it might also bankrupt the economy.

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