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President Obama is promoting new initiatives to improve education for Native American students. Ahniwake Rose, executive director of the National Indian Education Association, has the details.

As the violence in Iraq begins to close in on Baghdad, host Michel Martin learns more about the conflict from The Wall Street Journal's Farnaz Fassihi, and former U.S. interpreter Tariq Abu Khumra.

The Iraqi government was trying to verify a claim by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria that the group had killed hundreds of Shiite security forces.

When the drugs first appeared, U.S. law enforcement officials had a tough time figuring out what they contained and where they came from. One source was a lab in Shanghai.

There's a gold rush on in health information technology. Entrepreneurs and venture capitalists are betting on companies that aim to help consumers, insurers and providers save money.

A few weeks ago, U.S. Customs and Border Protection spotted an unfamiliar moth in a shipment of organic soybeans. It was a small victory in the effort to prevent the spread of exotic pests.

Insulin monitors and pumps are getting better, but a person with diabetes will tell you they're far from ideal. Potential solutions include one that delivers two hormones to control blood sugar.

As of 2012, rentals made up 35 percent of American households. Their numbers are growing, but the demand isn't easing rental rates. Many renters now pay more than 50 percent of their income on rent.

NPR's Arun Rath speaks with sports correspondent Tom Goldman about the U.S. national team's first game of the World Cup. The team faces off against Ghana in what promises to be a tough match for the Americans.

NPR's Arun Rath speaks with correspondent Leila Fadel in Erbil, Iraq, about the advance of forces from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, also known as ISIS.

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