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At a new library and museum in Ohio, Superman, the Yellow Kid and Calvin and Hobbes all live together. The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum houses millions of pages of material, from political cartoons to the most iconic issues of superhero comic books.

Insurers are holding down prices by including fewer doctors and hospitals in their health plans. Consumers may save money but at the cost of more restrictions on where they can get medical care that is covered.

As the world mourns Nelson Mandela, many Americans are remembering their involvement in his life. Celeste Headlee speaks to Sharon Gelman, of Artists for a New South Africa, which was founded in 1989 by actors like Alfre Woodard and Danny Glover, to fight apartheid.

Delays in processing blood screening samples for newborns could be putting millions of infants at risk for disabilities or even death. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Ellen Gabler of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel who investigated the screening track records of hospitals around the country.

A new study suggests that while most people want jobs that pay more, most of the jobs currently available are low wage. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with Ben Henry of the Alliance for a Just Society and Steven Greenhouse of The New York Times.

Children's voices, slashing grain, making tea and a call to prayer — all sounds of an American living in Senegal.

Since 2001, more than 100,000 troops have left the military with an other than honorable discharge. The "bad paper" puts benefits and medical care out of reach, even for those who served in combat. Which raises a simple question: What does America owe those who serve?

November is over and so is the big fall TV season. But there are bright gifts among the off-season also-rans, including TNT's Mob City and a French series about the undead.

David Greene talks with Sylvain Groulx, head of mission for Doctors without Borders in the Central African Republic, about the state of the violence there and the hopes for peace now that French troops have arrived.

Eight tech giants — including Google, Apple and Facebook — have written an open letter to the president and Congress warning that current government surveillance practices are undermining freedom. This follows leaks showing tech firms were part of widespread NSA surveillance programs of email and phone records.

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