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Jamaal Allan is a high school teacher in Des Moines, Iowa. People make assumptions based on his name alone, and that's taken him on a lifelong odyssey of racial encounters.

Teachers, students and administrators are stretched thin by serious overcrowding. The city could add 32 schools tomorrow and every one would be filled to capacity.

After years of recession and rampant tax evasion, the U.S. territory is desperate to renegotiate its $73 billion debt. But it can't declare bankruptcy, and plans to raise taxes face strong resistance.

The president says he's pushing for the controversial Trans-Pacific Partnership in part to boost "Made in the U.S.A." products around the world. So why make the pitch at Nike?

What comes from such tragic events are crucial lessons about policing for other cities. Mainly, they've taught officials the importance of keeping the public informed and good community relationships.

Venezuela's economic woes provide plenty of fodder for comedians. But the government doesn't seem to have a sense of humor: Comics say they are being targeted and prevented from performing.

London completely dominates the political, cultural and economic life of the U.K. to an extent rarely seen elsewhere. That imbalance has been an issue in the run-up to Thursday's election.

Secretary of State John Kerry took a surprise trip to Somalia on Tuesday. The visit is a first for a U.S. secretary of state. For more on Kerry's visit, Steve Inskeep speaks with NPR's Gregory Warner.

California officials are finalizing a mandatory plan to cut water use across the state. Cities looking for a road map on how to save water might consider Santa Barbara's example.

One Pittsburgh middle school teacher is giving his black students a valuable education in social studies — and life.




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