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At a free screening of the film in Selma, Ala., many in the audience — both black and white — had firsthand connections to the history portrayed on the screen.

The number of Americans over the age of 65 is expected to double in 35 years. That means more families grappling with what to do when a loved one can't live alone anymore.

Winter weather is making a vulnerable situation even worse for millions of Syrian refugees. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to UNICEF's Lucio Melandri about a program to provide winter clothes to refugees.

A decade ago, Irshad Manji called for reform within Islam in her book, The Trouble with Islam Today. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Manji about her reaction to the recent events in France.

We hear perspectives on the Charlie Hebdo attack, from Secretary of State John Kerry, French philosopher Bernard Henri Levy, Conan Obrien, Imam Anjem Choudary and Somali-born writer Ayaan Hirsi Ali.

Attorney General Eric Holder is attending international talks in Paris after the deadly attack on the satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to reporter Lauren Frayer in Paris.

The Oregon Health Plan just started covering the cost of reassignment surgery for transgender people. Oregon joins a handful of states that provide such coverage through Medicaid.

The Consumer Electronics Show has wrapped up its showcase of the latest in high-tech gizmos. But according to a survey from Fortune magazine, many Americans have a simpler wish: longer battery life.

Hopes that wages may finally be solidly on the rise were dashed in Friday's jobs report. While employers added 252,000 new jobs, average hourly earnings actually dipped.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell promised to make the Keystone XL pipeline the first order of business in the new term. One week in, however, the bill is still a long way from passing.

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