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Amid the latest case of poor police-community relations, critics are targeting N.Y.'s policing theory, which aims to crack down on minor offenses. But it's also praised for reducing the crime rate.

Dozens of soldiers have offered testimonials saying indiscriminate fire was tolerated, even encouraged in last summer's war in Gaza. This contributed to the high numbers of civilian deaths, they say.

The Marquis de Lafayette sailed from France to America in 1780 to help the new nation defeat the British. A $29 million replica of the Hermione tall ship is retracing that journey.

Long hours in practice might account for the higher concussion risk in high school and college football, a study finds. Some schools are retooling practice to reduce the number of hits.

Under narrow definitions of corruption, candidates courting billionaires to fuel their White House bids doesn't qualify. But some activists, on the left and the right, argue that it should.

Poor kids who moved to neighborhoods with less poverty did much better than those who didn't move.

There's plenty of speculation about whether the octogenarian author really intended to release the manuscript, discovered by her lawyer last year.

It's a deadly combination of infection and inflammation striking more than a million Americans every year. Doctors can treat the symptoms of sepsis, but they still can't treat the underlying problem.

An environmental group is behind the class-action suit that says the government is not doing enough to protect citizens. A ruling in the closely watched case is expected next month.

Photographer Matt Black spends his days capturing images that illustrate the impact of the drought on people living in California's Central Valley.




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