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Biotech companies are inserting new genes into microorganisms, turning them into tiny factories to produce valuable nutrients and flavors. But many of them don't want to talk about it.

In Nashville, several public schools are struggling to compete with nearby charters. To recruit more students, teachers are tearing a page from the charter playbook: going door to door.

Souq.com, created by U.S.-educated Ronaldo Mouchawar, has a strong presence in the Middle East. Since the boom in cell phones in the region, "you can feel the crescendo" in its tech sector, he says.

About 10 million more people in the U.S. now have health insurance than did this time last year. But some immigrants, low-income adults and others are still falling through the gaps.

Little-known in the U.S., Thomas Griesa is a villain and scapegoat in the Argentine press. The federal court judge in New York has ruled against Argentina in its battles with its "vulture" creditors.

NBC's Peter Pan Live! production seems to be utterly in earnest — but TV critic Eric Deggans wonders if the show will need a viewership boost from critics snarking on Twitter to really succeed.

Unlike the 1997 Kyoto treaty, the plan on the negotiating table in Lima this week asks every country, developed and developing, to limit carbon emissions. Each nation would set its own target.

Most telescope cameras can only capture a small patch of sky at a time. But a new camera has a much larger field of view, and its backers are hoping for help in deciphering its reams of data.

Ebola isn't the first dangerous microbe to spur calls for quarantine in American cities. But as New York City's experience with drug-resistant tuberculosis suggests, isolation isn't always best.

A neurologist's unorthodox thinking led to an experimental drug that allows trapped nerve fibers to grow again. And that growth helps amplify signals that restored movement in laboratory rates.

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