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Cliven Bundy and many of his militia followers are now in jail, but some Western ranchers vow to continue defying the federal government when it comes to cattle grazing on public lands.

But the agency projects that its checkpoints will screen 100 million more people in 2016 than it did in 2013 — even as its workforce has been reduced by 12 percent over that same time period.

The secretary of state negotiated the nuclear deal and wants it to work. He recently went to Europe to encourage banks there to invest in Iran.

The health agency is making changes so it can get boots on the ground if a pandemic strikes. But critics say it hasn't gone far enough.

Rising sea levels put extra pressure on coastal bedrock in South Florida. Eventually, as seawater moves in, it could contaminate plants on the surface and the region's stores of fresh water beneath.

It's the latest chapter in a long campaign against wage theft by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman. His office has already recovered millions of dollars in wages for low-income workers.

Need a vision test? Now you can do it online with a computer and a smartphone. The site has attracted a lot of attention in the tech world, but eye care professionals have concerns.

Forty years ago, the top names in French food and wine judged a blind tasting pitting the finest French wines against unknown California bottles. The results revolutionized the wine industry.

More than three years after Superstorm Sandy, NPR and PBS's Frontline investigate the thousands still not home, the government agencies that failed to help and the companies that made millions.

While some of his colleagues have criticized the current trend of starting sentences with the phrase, "I feel like," linguist Geoff Nunberg says it's just a case of generational misunderstanding.




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