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Amid record production, some analysts worry the U.S. will run out of places to put it all. One says lack of storage space could drive oil down to around $20 a barrel, less than half the current price.

There's a growing trend of hiking up mountains — in skis. Though it's banned at some resorts for safety reasons, enthusiasts in Aspen want make the town a hub for the emerging sport.

Treadmill desks were the hot new trend in exercising a few years ago. The idea was to get moving and lose weight at work. But a new study suggests people don't use them enough to make a difference.

Tight elasticized socks, sleeves and T-shirts supposedly make you a better athlete. But alas, science is pouring some cold water on those alluring claims.

A program in Hawaii aims to reduce the number of older people who spend their final days of life in a hospital. Hawaii has one of the highest rates of hospital deaths for those over age 65 in the U.S.

Abdullah Abdullah and Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, once fierce political rivals, traveled together to Washington last week to undo years of hostility between their predecessor and Obama.

The founder of modern Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew, used both free-market principles and strong central planning to transform the tiny former British colony into an economic powerhouse.

Following bombing raids on ISIS targets in Tikrit, Iraqi forces are preparing to retake the strategic city. Correspondent Alice Fordham tells NPR's Rachel Martin about her recent visit to the front.

The leftist Syriza party swept into office on a promise to stand up to European austerity demands. But the new government has had to soften its tone. Some Greeks worry the party is giving in.

Some of Hillary Clinton's most vocal critics are from those in the media. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to correspondent Mara Liasson about Clinton's evolving relationship with the press.

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