Listen to NPR Stories Online

The next time this phenomenon will happen is Aug. 13, 2049.

Fifty years ago, J.T. Johnson and Al Lingo jumped into a whites-only pool in Florida as part of a civil rights protest. They were taken to jail — after the hotel owner poured acid into the water.

Unsecure Wi-Fi networks have been a well-known vulnerability in the tech industry for years. They can let even an unsophisticated hacker capture your traffic and possibly steal your identity.

By a unanimous decision, the Supreme Court ruled that POM Wonderful's lawsuit against the Coca-Cola Co. may go on. The repercussions of the case for the food and beverage industry are unclear.

In Brazil, thousands of protesters clashed with police just hours before the World Cup opening ceremony. The streets of Sao Paolo were filled with tear gas and concussion grenades.

Facebook will share users' Web browsing habits with advertisers in order to help the latter target their ads more effectively. At the same time, Facebook announced a feature that allows users to see why targeted ads are coming their way.

Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Charles Wright, who will serve as the next poet laureate, tells NPR's Melissa Block that his inspirations — landscape, language and God — have stayed constant for 50 years.

Grave questions face the Iraqi government, and U.S. officials are scrambling to decide what to do. The U.S. helped shape the country; is there anything it can — or would — do to keep it together?

Rutgers University students now have a homework assignment they might look forward to: Listening to Beyonce. Professor Kevin Allred discusses his course, Politicizing Beyonce.

Before Cesar Millan became a TV personality, he was a homeless, undocumented immigrant from Mexico with a dream. He reveals how his career took off as part of NPR's series, "My Big Break."

Pages

©2014 WLRH PUBLIC RADIO

Address

WLRH Public Radio
UAH Campus
John Wright Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899

Get Directions

Phone

LOCAL:
(256) 895-9574

TOLL-FREE:
(800) 239-9574