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The University of North Carolina is up for its sixth overall title, while Gonzaga is going for its first, in Monday night's championship game.

Outspoken and influential Russian poet Yevgeny Yevtushenko died over the weekend. He was known for his criticism of anti-Semitism and of the Soviet Union.

NPR's Robert Siegel speaks with Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, a member of the Judiciary Committee, about why she voted against Neil Gorsuch for the Supreme Court and why she supports a Democratic filibuster.

Journalist Ben Taub of The New Yorker spent several months following a Nigerian teenage girl's route as she tries to reach Europe, risking death, forced labor and sex work.

Currently, insurance rates are calculated based on drivers' claims histories and driving records. Driverless cars are expected to shift the liability toward carmakers. But it won't happen all at once.

A New York City hospital has created a playlist of songs with the ideal tempo for CPR, although previous research suggests there is more to good chest compressions than just the right tempo.

Photos of an owl swooping in with wings wide, eyes glowing and talons outstretched might not really be because of chance. Photographers using mice to lure the owls have caused a fierce debate.

What happens to workers when an industry fails, new technology takes off? NPR brings you stories of Americans adapting to a changing economy. This week: Leaving the black cannabis market to go legal.

Trump signed an executive order this week that will begin to roll back some of Obama's signature climate change policies. Georgetown University's Varum Sivaram explains what that could mean for China.

We consider what might happen if Senate Republicans resort to the "nuclear option" of changing Senate rules to thwart a potential Democratic filibuster of Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch.

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