Listen to NPR Stories Online

A Philadelphia health insurance company analyzes its clients' health data and other factors to find the frailest and assign them health coaches. That may improve health, but is it a breach of privacy?

Since the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision, money in politics has exploded. To make it in the 2016 presidential race, candidates need their own billionaire. Here's who's lining up with whom.

New regulations are scheduled to take effect July 1 — the latest in a series of challenges to the industry.

There are a few populations in the world where back pain hardly exists. One woman thinks she has figured out why, and she's sharing their secrets. Have Americans forgotten how to stand properly?

Karim Wasfi, conductor of the Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra, has been playing his cello at the sites of deadly attacks across Baghdad.

The sentence of 10 years in prison and 1,000 lashes has drawn international condemnation but remains in place for Raif Badawi, a blogger who had earlier been found guilty of "insulting" Islam. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with correspondent Deborah Amos in Riyadh, the Saudi capital.

Many elite charter schools boast of making students from challenging socio-economic backgrounds ready for college. Now some programs are focused on helping more of those students finish their degrees.

Protesters burned ballots and election materials in a rocky start to voting in elections already marred by the murders of candidates and campaign officials. Reporter Carrie Kahn speaks with NPR's Arun Rath from Mexico City, where she has been talking to voters.

California's Senate approved the End of Life Option Act, a bill that would allow doctor-assisted suicide for some terminally ill patients. The bill had been stalled for years, in part because doctors opposed it. But last month the California Medical Association dropped its opposition, becoming the first state medical association to do so. NPR's Arun Rath talks to Dr. Theodore Mazer, a member of the association's executive board, about the decision.

The Illinois Republican, who served as Speaker of the House of Representatives from 1999 to 2007, will hear charges of withdrawing funds illegally and lying to the FBI. He's not the first high-profile Illinois politician to run afoul of the law.




WLRH Public Radio
UAH Campus
John Wright Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899

Get Directions


(256) 895-9574

(800) 239-9574