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The Russian economy took a big hit in 2014. The U.S. and other countries imposed economic sanctions after Russia annexed Crimea, but it was falling oil prices that really hurt the country.

More than 8 million U.S. children don't get enough to eat. In Sacramento, Calif., one school is helping families cope by sending students home for the weekend with backpacks full of groceries.

This was a big year for corporate mergers, with $3 trillion worth of deals announced worldwide. Analysts say the strong acquisitive trend is expected to continue into next year.

The Common Core had a rough year. The learning standards were repealed in three states, including Oklahoma. But what happens the day after a state repeals its academic standards?

Champagne and other booze flow freely on New Year's Eve. But if you want to wake to a new year without the side effects of alcohol, don't fret: Science offers some guidance.

The president says incidents in the past year have "surfaced" long-simmering issues between minority communities and authorities, allowing for a healthy airing of grievances.

From the VA and Secret Service scandals to Ebola, each week brought another hot issue into the White House briefing room. Here's a look at just how short the press corps' attention span was in 2014.

Everyone knows it's dangerous to drink and drive, but a lot of people still do it. Strict enforcement of traffic laws makes it less likely that people will get behind the wheel when soused.

States have passed more than 200 abortion regulations since 2010, and the number is expected to rise. Abortion rights supporters say that could cause big geographical variations in access to care.

Daniel Majok Gai fled South Sudan twice because of war. He wants to return for good. But for now, he's giving back by helping youth there gain an education. His inspiration: a girl named Annah.

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