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The cartels' business models are similar to those of big-box stores and franchises, says Tom Wainwright, former Mexico City bureau chief for The Economist. His new book is Narconomics.

Earlier research found that people in a messy work area were less likely to choose healthy snacks. Now a study hints that a cluttered kitchen might make those who feel out of control eat more sweets.

Millions of people take proton pump inhibitors. But the drugs can increase the risk of infections, bone fractures and kidney problems. And trying to stop the drugs can make symptoms much worse.

NPR's Nina Totenberg explains how the idea that the Constitution is "not living but dead" transformed the Supreme Court during Antonin Scalia's tenure as a justice.

NPR's Carrie Johnson and Ron Elving talk to host Michel Martin about the political battle developing over the replacement of the late Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia.

He was one of six Catholics on the court and the most outspoken about his faith. But he said "the only article in faith that plays any part in my judging is the commandment, 'Thou Shalt Not Lie.'"

A hairstyle set off a firestorm at a recent Arizona high school basketball game. The referee told Flagstaff's Lady Eagles they couldn't wear traditional Navajo buns. KJZZ's Laurel Morales reports.

Both Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton tout their support among African-Americans. Rachel Martin speaks with NPR's Sam Sanders about who might have the leg up in the upcoming South Carolina primary.

Because it's a presidential election year, should President Obama not nominate a new Supreme Court justice? Rachel Martin and NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson discuss.

The State Department sponsored a contest to find the best ways to combat ISIS propaganda online. A group of cadets from West Point got second prize. Rachel Martin speaks with team member CJ Drew.

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