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When it comes to dam safety, human eyes are still one of the best tools to recognize problems — so in some areas, workers live in remote locations to watch over the water supply.

Greater access to child care is central to Japan's "womenomics" policy. The hope is that more day care will mean more women remain in the workforce after they become mothers.

Moira Demos and Laura Ricciardi were film students when they started working on their 10-part Netflix series about Steven Avery. "We had no money, but what we did have was time," Demos says.

Service dogs help veterans with physical disabilities, and there's increased interest in using dogs for symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, too. A study is underway to see whether that helps.

As part of a new partnership, the two companies also announced that they're rolling out a service for the human drivers of today to rent vehicles, rather than use their own.

Founded in 1991 as a temporary shelter for Somalis, the Dadaab complex in Kenya now houses nearly half a million refugees. Ben Rawlence profiles nine of its residents in his new book, City of Thorns.

This year, California becomes the fifth state to legalize lethal drug prescriptions for terminally ill patients. Renee Montagne talks to Carin van Zyl, a palliative care doctor, about the options.

The First Folio is the first printed collection of all of Shakespeare's plays, assembled by two of his buddies after he died. Without it, plays like Macbeth and Twelfth Night might not have survived.

Around age 50, people may begin to forget things. This can be scary. But there are clear differences between the onset of dementia and totally normal, age-related lapses in memory.

A mouse's brain clears out toxins during periods of deep sleep — including toxins that form the sticky plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease. Could the same hold true for people?

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