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When African-American players on the University of Missouri's football team called for a boycott of games, it was the latest moment in a long history of players taking a stand for civil rights.

Ivo Cassol is a prominent Brazilian politician who made his money in cattle ranching and logging in the Amazon. He says the world should pay Brazil a lot more if it wants to preserve the rain forest.

The first presidential debate broadcast lasted one hour, and was broadcast without commercial interruption. Dewey and Stassen debated whether the Communist Party in the U.S. should be outlawed.

High unemployment, a weak central government and recent Taliban gains are creating a growing apprehension on the streets of the capital, Kabul.

"We used to refer to our detention as a 'DT' — a 'Donny Trump' — because he got more of them than most other people in the class," said one of Trump's grade school classmates.

The World Health Organization will start phasing out the oral vaccine next spring.

These days, owners are asking for their four-legged friends to be styled as spheres and squares. We visit the Taiwanese grooming shop where the geometric grooming trend took root.

Tim Wolfe resigned Monday morning following mounting pressure over racial animosity on campus. The protests included a hunger strike and a boycott by some of the school's football players.

A provision in the highway bills before Congress would require the IRS to hire collection agencies to collect back taxes. Congress sees it as a way of raising money to pay for highway construction. Opponents say it would lead to abuses, and that it's been tried in the past — and cost taxpayers more than it brought in.

The German automaker is starting the process of making amends with its U.S. customer base. The company is offering $1,000 in cash and vouchers to owners of diesel vehicles implicated in the emissions scandal.

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