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The study examined more than 21,000 characters and behind-the-scenes workers on films and TV, and found an "epidemic of invisibility." For example, just 3.4 percent of film directors were female.

Days after Apple's CEO wrote an open letter to customers, the head of the FBI responds by urging those involved to "take a deep breath and stop saying the world is ending."

Apple is opposing an FBI request to defeat the security on the San Bernardino shooter's phone — but it's not the first time Apple has opposed such an order. A 2015 case may hint at what's to come.

Jeb Bush hoped to be the third Bush elected to the White House, and carry on a dynasty that began with George H.W. Bush's first presidential run in 1980.

U.S. disease detectives are launching a research project that health authorities hope will produce the most definitive evidence yet about whether the virus is really causing birth defects.

A decade after phasing out celestial navigation from its academy courses, the U.S. Navy has restarted that formal training. The shift comes at a time of growing anxiety over possible threats to GPS.

Fewer people are having strokes now than decades ago. But that improvement seems to be mostly among the elderly. Young people are actually having more strokes, partly because of the rise in obesity.

Evangelical voters are often talked about as a key part of the electorate. But the actual number of evangelical voters and their religious beliefs are not nearly as clear-cut as pundits think.

In Kalamazoo, Mich., at least six people are dead and others injured after multiple shootings Saturday. Authorities say the shootings were random. Michigan Public Radio's Rick Pluta has an update.

Antonio Maldonado wants Apple to increase diversity among its senior executives, and he's taking his fight to the shareholders meeting on Feb. 26.

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