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The AP Style Guide and Chicago Manual of Style are the gold standards for questions about capitalization, grammar, or usage. But what if you need to know how to properly write Jay Z's name? Buzzfeed's Copy Editor Emmy Favilla discusses the website's style guide for the Internet.

Washington, D.C. is digging out from the snow, but Congress is already long gone on a two week recess. Host Michel Martin speaks with Christopher Ave of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and Corey Dade of The Root, about the latest political news.

Matchmaking apps like Tinder can help people find potential dates quickly, but sometimes efficiency isn't the best way to find true love.

Getty's new "Lean In" collection steers clear of familiar stereotypes, such as women in stilettos stepping on men. Because women are the primary users of social media, the company's visual trends director says, it's time for a different kind of representation in media and advertising.

Most Iranians back President Hassan Rouhani's efforts to reach out to the world, but so far there's been very little tangible improvement in an economy that's been hurting for years.

President Obama used to say that he wanted to rely more on career diplomats to serve as U.S. ambassadors. But he's been opting for political appointees who are big donors with limited international experience.

The U.S. is defending its gold medal in men's figure skating, but without the star power of previous games. Two skaters in Sochi, 19-year-old Jason Brown and 28-year-old Jeremy Abbott — represent the near future of the sport in America.

The world is at greater risk than ever from pandemics and biological weapons, health officials said Thursday. In response, the U.S. government is spearheading a global effort to build an early warning system for infectious diseases, drug-resistant microbes and possible bioterror agents.

A fliers' revolt on Valentine's Day in 2007 led to stiff fines against airlines that kept passengers waiting for too long. The delays still happen, but new technology and better planning are making them less inconvenient.

Strained relations between Afghanistan and the U.S. and NATO may only get worse this week. The Afghan government is releasing 65 prisoners, many of whom have been accused by the West of plotting and participating in terrorist activities. Robert Siegel speaks with Nathan Hodge of The Wall Street Journal to learn more about the rationale behind this release and what it might mean for Afghan security and diplomacy.

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