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Demand for palm oil is destroying the habitat of endangered Sumatran orangutans. One group is working to rescue, rehabilitate and reintroduce these often-orphaned primates back into the wild.

Thousands of Iraqis and Afghans have been resettled in the U.S. through a special visa program, but hundreds of cases are on hold.

Last year, Congress tried to make getting care for vets easier by giving them the option of going outside of VA facilities. Seems pretty simple, but making that rule work hasn't been all that easy.

Israelis and Palestinians have now been living cheek-and-jowl in the West Bank for decades. NPR's Steve Inskeep visited both communities to sample their views in this enduring conflict.

The price of copper is down 40 percent from four years ago. Arizona residents from smaller mining towns worry about job losses, but some companies are planning to expand in the state.

A few years ago, Nicaragua was almost totally dependent on imported fuel. Now the country's fierce winds, sun and volcanoes generate half the country's electricity, and perhaps 80 percent soon.

One in four abortions is induced with medications rather than a surgical procedure. But the process faces a growing number of legal restrictions, including a law in Ohio.

Recent scandals involving student athletes at Syracuse University and other prominent athletic departments, remind commentator Frank Deford of speakeasies during Prohibition.

The Southern Baptist Convention is quietly nudging its 16 million members to tie the knot at a younger age. Baptist leaders say that marriage should be considered a foundation of adult life.

Drugs made from proteins or antibodies are difficult for rival manufacturers to copy. The Food and Drug Administration just approved a copycat drug for cancer patients that shows it can be done.




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