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In today's digital age it's easy to forget about paper, but as one paper pusher says, "a paperless society is about as plausible as a paperless bathroom."

As California's drought continues, social media and smart phone apps let just about anyone call out water waste, often very publicly.

Every year, a history teacher in Columbus, Miss., takes high schoolers to the local cemetery. There, they tell the stories of those who are buried, and learn more about their own place in the world.

How did a monument to the USS Maine, which sank in Havana Harbor in 1898, come to rest in Indiana? The answer tells a lot about the power and influence of veterans, years after war.

They've been supporting the men for years. But for the first time, the American Outlaws — a growing and influential U.S. soccer fan group — will cheer for the women's national team at a World Cup.

"I take these pictures so that we can look; we can see what we're not supposed to see," says photographer David Jay. "And we need to see them because we created them."

Since 2011, the Indian Ocean island of Reunion has had 16 shark attacks, seven of them fatal. It's a sharp rise from previous years; Australia is the only country with more deaths during this span.

Conservatives in Tira pushed back hard at the idea of women and men running together in a public race. Someone went so far as to shoot at race organizer Haneen Radi's car. For now, the run is off.

In a Boston neighborhood, WBUR's Steve Brown seeks out the story of a Marine honored by one of the many markers throughout the city that commemorates sacrifice in war.

The cost of medication to treat multiple sclerosis has risen much faster than inflation, even for older drugs. Patients and insurers say manufacturers' subsidy programs have helped, but not enough.

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