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Much of the Benghazi discussion has focused on the deaths of four Americans. The family of Chris Stevens, the late ambassador to Libya, has memorialized him with projects to improve understanding between Americans and people in the Middle East and North Africa, the areas where he served as a diplomat, and where his sister Anne Stevens says he developed many close friendships.

Once an obscure hub of specialists, the yearly gathering of the Society of Neuroscience now draws some of the biggest and brightest from other fields too, seeking answers to brain and body secrets.

The EU wants Turkey to keep more Syrian migrants from flooding into Europe. But the Syrians don't want to stay in a country that won't give them work permits or citizenship.

Not only Hillary Clinton has a lot at stake in how her appearance goes Thursday before the House Select Committee on Benghazi. So too does the panel. Democrats says its aim is primarily to damage Clinton's presidential bid. Republicans say they're trying to get to the truth about Benghazi. Today's their chance to show who's right.

Farming is unpredictable. So many farmers count on complicated financial agreements to ensure they have a steady source of income. But one time, these futures markets led to two investors owning almost all of the onions in the Midwest. And the legacy of that wild tale helps us understand the essential intersection of farming and finance.

Dozens of India's writers have returned awards from the National Academy of Letters in recent weeks in protest against an environment of what they call "fear and uncertainty" in the world's biggest democracy.

David Axelrod, as one of President Barack Obama's political inner circle, has an intimate view on Vice President Joe Biden's political decision-making process. Axelrod discusses what went into Biden's choice to stay out of the 2016 presidential race.

The Magna Carta, considered the founding document of modern civil liberties, is touring China where it is getting less than royal treatment.

Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif is in Washington this week to meet with President Obama. His visit comes amid news that the Obama administration is trying to work out a deal with Pakistan to limit its nuclear arsenal.

New research finds that e-signatures can potentially make people behave in more dishonest ways. It turns out people are less willing to lie and cheat when they handwrite and sign their full names instead of using an e-signature, computer generated user code or other form of identity verification.

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