Listen to NPR Stories Online

Many states want to boost their economies through business startups. But outside of Silicon Valley, funding for private investors is hard to get. States are giving equity crowdfunding more attention.

Americans spend billions of dollars every year on annual physicals. But there's little evidence that a yearly checkup helps healthy adults. Some doctors are telling patients to skip it.

Women under 55 are twice as likely to die after being hospitalized for a heart attack than men. Women delay treatment because they may not recognize the symptoms and they're reluctant to make a fuss.

Some scientists suggest calling the era we live in the Anthropocene, to denote the time when humans came to dominate Earth's fate. But did it start with farming, the atom bomb or other event?

Leaders of what some call a new civil rights struggle say the protests must lead to long-term strategies. The goal is to sustain a national movement and to get past challenging obstacles.

Financial advisers advocate using cash whenever possible. But new technologies are making it easier to do just the opposite. Still, a recent study shows more millennials are turning away from plastic.

During its last major drought, Santa Barbara built a desalination plant. It was never used. Now it's being reopened, but critics say desalination is costly, energy-intensive and may harm marine life.

Brittany Diamond, 22, wants to challenge what you might think you know about strong women. "My sport has nothing to do with aesthetics," she says.

Wilderness Torah celebrates the holiday in a setting rooted in heritage. Participants immerse in Jewish culture but also find meaningful personal connections from isolation not felt in everyday life.

Following a bitterly contested election, outgoing President Goodluck Jonathan offered congratulations to his successor, Muhammadu Buhari, who said, "We must begin to heal the wounds and work towards a better future."




WLRH Public Radio
UAH Campus
John Wright Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899

Get Directions


(256) 895-9574

(800) 239-9574