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The type of storm that's blowing up the East Coast of the U.S. on Tuesday has an explosive-sounding name. Add bombogenesis to the growing list of weather terms we're learning about this winter — a list that also includes polar vortex.

Up a barren, narrow valley in the West Bank hills, a small community of herders raises sheep and goats. But it is also an Israeli military zone. NPR's Emily Harris visited the community one day, and returned the next to find their flimsy homes bulldozed by Israeli court order.

A poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health finds that nearly 1 in 5 Latinos say diabetes is the major health concern for themselves and their family. In East Los Angeles, where obesity and diabetes are common, community activists are committed to turning the problem around.

It's a cliché and an understatement to say Latino-Americans aren't a monolithic group. But our survey of nearly 1,500 Latinos underscores the variety of different experiences collapsed into the term "Latino."

The Winter Olympics bobsled, luge and skeleton track was designed with safety in mind, not just speed. It was constructed after an athlete died in a violent crash, and others complained of out-of-control speed, at the Olympics four years ago.

An Illinois case examines whether states may recognize a union for workers who care for disabled adults in their homes instead of state institutions; and whether non-union members must pay for a contract they benefit from.

"Hands-free" is taking on a new meaning. Games hitting the market use EEGs so you can move a toy helicopter with your mind or play the brain like a musical instrument. It's the stuff of sci-fi movies, but potentially with an added health benefit.

These cousins of the shark send thousands of waders and surfers yelping for medical help each year. A powerful toxin in the barb of the ray's tail triggers a "knifelike pain" that can last for hours. Best prevention? Do the "stingray shuffle."

This week in Iran, international inspectors are stepping up surveillance of the country's nuclear program. The inspections are at the heart of a landmark deal that freezes Iran's uranium enrichment in exchange for billions of dollars in relief from sanctions, but they are just a first step.

Over the past decade, thousands of mentally ill people have been funneling in and out of the nation's jails, landing in places that are ill-equipped to treat them. Illinois' Cook County Jail has some of the most innovative programs in the country, but staff say it's a far cry from actual treatment.

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