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The musicians who live in countries along the Nile rarely got to meet — until the Nile Project came along. Now they learn from each other, make records together and are currently touring the U.S.

Ukrainian forces and pro-Russia separatists are still exchanging fire and inflicting casualties at hot spots in eastern Ukraine. The separatists haven't withdrawn heavy weapons, Ukrainians say.

Tunisia's president says his country is "in a merciless war against terrorism." The victims reportedly include travelers from Japan, France, Poland, Italy, Colombia, Australia, Britain and Spain.

President Obama defends his economic track record, even as Republicans are trying to change the government's fiscal course. House and Senate committees unveiled draft budgets that would cut spending.

It's all in the timing. Biologists haven't been able to breed embryos of the rare, pillar coral in the lab because it's been tough to catch the creatures in the act.

The length of the average car loan isn't just creeping up, it's leaping up. Nearly 40 percent of people secure car loans that take more than five years to pay off. The trend has some analysts alarmed.

This weekend, residents of Washington state will mark one year since a massive mudslide devastated a small community, killing 43 people and destroying dozens of homes in a matter of minutes.

As part of an experiment, the men and women of a Marine armor unit are being assessed on difficult physical tasks, such as hooking up heavy towing gear. The women are keeping up, but it's a struggle.

The hormone that controls blood sugar among diabetics is one of the oldest medicines used today. But more than 90 years after its discovery, a low-cost version is no longer available in the U.S.

Benjamin Netanyahu's re-election is likely to cause President Obama more headaches when it comes to dealing with Republicans, the Iran negotiations and the Israeli-Palestinian peace process.




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