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New brands are reshaping the apple aisle of supermarkets. Many are "club apples" --varieties that are controlled and managed by select groups of farmers.

Texts from Jane Eyre imagines a Mr. Rochester who worries over his "attic wife" and a super flirty Scarlett O'Hara: "did you know that pantalets are out this year[?] that's why I'm not wearing any :)"

Scientists in England are ready to do something that's never been done before — combine the DNA of two women and one man to create embryos that don't carry hereditary mitochondrial disorders.

Red means stop; green means go. You live in a red state or a blue state. Elizabeth Blair kicks off NPR's color series with a look at the way color organizes our lives — in ways we don't even realize.

With gas prices plunging below $3 a gallon, motorists have plenty to celebrate. But people in oil-producing states, where low prices mean fewer jobs and less government revenue, are starting to worry.

Eugene Vigosky is one of thousands of Americans killed in World War II buried at the American Cemetery in Normandy. Reporter Tim Lambert, a friend of the Vigoskys, visited the grave site.

With Iraq's military in tatters and U.S. forces gone, the Kurdish peshmerga is the only viable force to stave off ISIS in Iraq. With little support from Baghdad, discontent grows among the fighters.

Separatists in Catalonia are going ahead with an unofficial referendum on independence from Spain. They go to the polls today despite a high court order forbidding the vote.

Two Americans jailed in North Korea have arrived home. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with former U.S. Ambassador Bill Richardson, who has previously negotiated hostage releases with Pyongyang.

In 2012, 56,337 people were murdered in Brazil. But that figure hides a color-coded truth: Homicide rates are actually way down — if you're white. If you're black? Murder rates are up 40 percent.

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