Listen to NPR Stories Online

Jonathan Keleher is one of a handful of people known to have lived their entire lives without a cerebellum. His experiences are helping scientists show how this brain structure helps shape who we are.

Baseball has long been labeled America's pastime, but some have argued that politics actually deserves that title. It turns out there are more than a few parallels between the two this time of year.

Dogs are routinely used by police forces for crime investigations, drug sniffing or search and rescue missions. But to L.A. county K-9 handler, Karina Peck, "Indy" the dog is more than a co-worker.

The St. Louis County Police Department arrested a suspect in the shooting that wounded two police officers last Thursday in Ferguson, Mo. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Emanuele Berry of St. Louis Public Radio about the arrest and investigation.

The Center for Students in Recovery at the University of Texas is one of a small but growing number of programs catering to former addicts at U.S. colleges and universities.

NPR's Arun Rath talks with international correspondent Peter Kenyon about the resumption of nuclear talks with Iran, as Secretary of State John Kerry meets with Iran's foreign minister in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Getting a ticket isn't all bad when it's in Farmington, N.H. Police Chief John Drury tells NPR's Rachel Martin that officers there are giving out pizza coupons for good behavior.

Some dolls don't look quite right. There's just something creepy about them. Turns out those dolls fetch a high price on eBay and Etsy.

Forget cathedrals and wine houses. A new guided tour takes visitors to Portugal's slums to see the effects of Europe's economic crisis. This story originally aired March 10 on Morning Edition.

Isaac Herzog doesn't have the macho profile of recent Israeli prime ministers. But Ari Shavit of Haaretz tells NPR's Rachel Martin that he's emerging as a frontrunner to unseat Benjamin Netanyahu.




WLRH Public Radio
UAH Campus
John Wright Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899

Get Directions


(256) 895-9574

(800) 239-9574