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This weekend marks the 75th anniversary of Franklin Roosevelt's executive order that led to the internment of Japanese-Americans. We hear from two people who were interned when they were children.

A rural road in northern New York has become a magnet for migrants who no longer want to stay in the U.S. Growing numbers are stepping into Canada, knowing Mounties immediately will arrest them.

Trade in food between the U.S. and Mexico has exploded over the past 15 years. President Trump is talking about restricting that trade, but when it comes to food, such moves could backfire.

Immigrant rights groups in New Orleans are organizing to resist Trump's move to deport people who are in the country illegally. But city and state leaders have conflicting positions.

New Jersey could be the first state to ban veterinarians from declawing cats. Critics say it's barbaric. But some veterinarians say the practice helps prevent cats from being euthanized.

Investigators are beginning to shed light on the mysterious, sudden death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's estranged half-brother in Malaysia on Tuesday.

Churches across the country are preparing to offer shelter and protection to immigrants in the country illegally. That sets up a conflict between Trump's policies on immigration and religious freedom.

In Vice President Pence's hometown of Columbus, Ind., there are a lot immigrants with H1-B visas who were affected by the on-hold executive order. Others are scared they could be next.

Journalist Chadwick Moore says he's coming out. He's not coming out as gay — he did that a long time ago. Instead, Moore says he's abandoned the political left and has found a home on the right.

The military's archaeology unit conducts excavations but keeps some information about the digs secret. "This approach raises suspicions," says an Israeli archaeologist who favors greater transparency.

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