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Navajo Nation voters decided this week that their tribal presidents should not be required to speak fluent Navajo. One 23-year-old, a fluent Navajo speaker, disagrees.

Activists say the Syrian regime continues to attack its people with chlorine gas — with little reaction from an international community once focused on preventing Syria's use of chemical weapons.

A plan for a cemetery in Farmersville, north of Dallas, sparked a debate among residents. The mayor of the mostly white community says it will likely be approved, but some are pushing for a no vote.

There's a festive air in Nairobi with the arrival of President Obama for his first visit since being elected. His focus is on promoting African entrepreneurs and getting electricity to rural areas.

There are times when obscene words are heard, but they are rare. Editors balance respect for listeners against the news value of the language.

A century and a half ago, the poet and philosopher headed to New York's Adirondack Mountains with some notable pals. Today, we follow his journey with a new crew, the help of a painting and a book.

They're facing a double whammy. Not only do customers have less money to spend, but businesses can no longer pay their foreign suppliers for goods and raw materials. Many fear they'll have to close.

The state passed a tough gun law in 2013, but the people "have repealed it on their own. They're just ignoring the law," says the head of the New York State Rifle and Pistol Association.

A federally mandated study shows that almost 300,000 Vietnam veterans still struggle with daily health problems linked to the traumas they experienced more than 40 years ago during the war.

The FDA wants to revamp the Nutrition Facts panels on foods. The labels would have to list how much added sugar the foods contain — and how much it counts against your recommended daily allowance.

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