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The "school-to-prison pipeline" is what many activists call education policies that push troubled kids out of class, and into the criminal justice system. Broward County has taken steps to address those concerns by moving away from "zero tolerance" rules of discipline. Guest host Celeste Headlee discusses the new program with Marsha Ellison of the Broward County NAACP, and Michael Krezmien, a professor of student development at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

A hundred years after his birth, French writer and Nobel laureate Albert Camus is perhaps best-known around the world for novels like The Stranger and The Plague and his philosophy of absurdism. But it's his politics and views about Algeria's brutal fight for independence that continue to make waves in France.

It seems obvious to say that a high approval rating helps a president, while a low approval rating hurts him. But there are reasons to think Obama's weak standing in the polls isn't as troublesome as it sounds.

As a multitude of mobile devices dominate our work and personal lives, people are buying fewer pens, especially high-end ones. That's doomed many mom-and-pop pen shops, including a century-old New York City store that closed its doors in August. But a few stores are still holding on, relying on those who treat pens like jewelry.

The health care law is helping low- and middle-income Americans pay for their insurance. Where does that money come from? In part, it is a matter of the well-off helping pay for those who have less. But that's not the full answer.

In 2001, Portland, Ore., was the first to develop a new kind of streetcar system. Success there led to a resurgence, with at least two dozen cities planning, building or expanding trolley lines — places like Atlanta, St. Louis and Tucson, Ariz. But some wonder whether it's the best way to spend limited transit dollars.

It's been a year since Washington state voted to legalize marijuana for recreational use. That's meant some big changes along Interstate 5, sometimes called the "Marijuana Highway." Police are phasing out pot-sniffing dogs, but are becoming more vigilant about what some call "green DUIs."

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford's use of crack has embarrassed the city he serves and made his name into a punch line. In her 'Can I Just Tell You' essay, host Michel Martin looks beyond the jokes, to what Ford's situation says about addiction.

For women, hair care can be a sensitive issue. But now one woman is picking a fight over hair care with the state of Texas. Host Michel Martin speaks with Isis Brantley who is suing the state for the right to teach hair braiding.

Hazing and bullying are commonly found in schoolyards and fraternities. But pro sports? The NFL is investigating possible harassment within the Miami Dolphins between veteran guard Richie Incognito and offensive tackle Jonathan Martin. Host Michel Martin speaks with sportswriter Kevin Blackistone about the culture of bullying and hazing within the NFL.

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