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Exceptionally dry conditions are fueling major blazes across the Pacific Northwest. A drought and rapid development in Washington mean the state may not be prepared to deal with a long, hot summer.

In an interview with NPR, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said the nuclear deal reached with Iran will allow it to attain a nuclear bomb even if Iran complies with the terms.

Making yogurt requires bacteria — but which strains of bacteria? There are dozens to choose from, and that choice affects yogurt's tartness and texture.

U.S. authorities had wanted Joaquin Guzman extradited, in part over fears that he would get out again. Mexican authorities refused. His escape likely will deepen distrust between the countries.

From high-heeled kicks to Air Jordans, a traveling exhibit from the Brooklyn Museum encourages us to look at everyday footwear as exquisite objects of desire, and see "sneakerheads" as the historians.

Dr. David Casarett used to think of medical marijuana as "a joke." But after taking a deeper look, he's changed his mind. Casarett's new book is Stoned: A Doctor's Case for Medical Marijuana.

New images of Pluto are beginning to arrive from NASA's space probe, and they're already allowing scientists to update what we know about the dwarf planet.

GM and the UAW kicked off contract talks Monday; Chrysler and Ford will do the same this month. Negotiations are never easy, but since industry bailouts in 2009, there's a stronger push to cooperate.

Renee Montagne talks with Thomas Erdbrink, Tehran bureau chief for the New York Times, about how Iranians are reacting to the nuclear deal reached with the U.S. and other western powers.

If Congress passes a measure of disapproval regarding the lifting of Iran sanctions, President Obama likely would veto it — meaning a two-thirds majority would have to opposed Tuesday's agreement.

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