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The extremists now committing a wave of attacks in Iraq's Anbar province are significantly better trained, funded and equipped than the al-Qaida-linked groups American soldiers battled there.

This winter's unexpected arctic bird invasion has given owl researchers a rare opportunity. They're fitting a few of the errant owls with GPS backpacks to track their return to the Arctic.

The government wants to build sea walls that will be 30 feet high in places and stretch for more than 200 miles. Some say the $8 billion effort is too costly and will ruin the beaches.

In an interview, Eric Holder says he's open to talking with Edward Snowden about terms of surrender. And the attorney general is unhappy with the vote to block a nominee to a top Justice Dept. post.

Two men apparently boarded Malaysia Airlines flight 370 with stolen passports. The U.S. has safeguards to prevent that from happening on U.S.-bound flights, but other nations are not as diligent.

Andrew Cuomo says funding prison college classes will cut recidivism rates. But critics say it's unfair to pay for prisoners' educations while middle-class families struggle with college costs.

A Brooklyn waste treatment plant has become an unlikely lab for an ambitious effort to turn millions of tons of food scraps from New York City's apartments and restaurants into renewable energy.

Companies want to know what you think of their product — and they're not afraid to ask. Surveys might be annoyingly pervasive to customers, but they provide valuable information for a low price.

NASA needs Russian rockets to reach the International Space Station, and Russia needs NASA's money to help finance operations.

The soft drink giant is one of the few big U.S. firms with major investments in Russia. And the reasons why say a lot about why the U.S. has less leverage in Russia than it might like.

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