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The New York Times' new Web redesign includes "native advertising": articles written by people working for the paper's advertisers. BuzzFeed and other outlets have already embraced the ads, but critics say the lines between paid and original content are sometimes just too blurry.

The country is producing more natural gas than it can burn, but frigid weather has made it harder for companies to deliver that gas to those who need it, especially in densely populated areas in the Northeast. As a result, prices have skyrocketed.

Syria's civil war keeps getting more complicated. In the latest twist, fractious rebel groups have united to fight extremists linked to al-Qaida. Both sides oppose the Syrian government, but for now they are pointing their guns at each other and a nasty battle is taking place in the northern city of Raqqa.

A small Canadian company has created a genetically engineered apple that doesn't go brown when you slice it. It's waiting for approval from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. But some apple producers are worried that this new product will taint the apple's wholesome, all-natural image.

It's been 50 years since President Lyndon B. Johnson declared war on poverty. Host Michel Martin speaks with Anne Mosle, of the Aspen Institute, about how much has changed since then and if the battle needs a new plan of attack.

Holly Brooks made the switch from coach to world-class athlete in 2009, after an epiphany on a hospital gurney. Now she's hoping to compete in the Winter Olympics for a second time. She says she has something many of her younger competitors lack: perspective.

Should they or shouldn't they? That's the question Brazilians are asking themselves after Edward Snowden's "open letter" lauding Brazil's role in protecting privacy rights and alluding to his hand in uncovering spying against their president.

In 1964, President Johnson traveled to Martin County, Ky., to try to sell his "war on poverty" to the American public. The initiative spawned dozens of government programs, including Medicaid and Head Start. Residents in Martin County say the programs helped — but what they really need is steady work.

Alpine skier Lindsey Vonn's decision to withdraw from the 2014 Winter Olympics could mean big changes for companies that were planning to capitalize on her name — and on her potential wins. But some of Vonn's sponsors may find her announcement actually opens new advertising opportunities.

After a procedural vote in the Senate on a bill that would temporarily extend emergency insurance for the jobless, President Obama held a White House press conference to pressure Congress to keep the momentum going. But Republican leaders say they need spending cuts or job-creation plans in return.

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