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A group of synthetic biologists report they've created an organism with a minimum number of genes required to survive and reproduce.

A musical by Tony-nominated songwriters Benj Pasek and Justin Paul opens Saturday in New York. "Dear Evan Hansen" is a comedy-drama about social anxiety and teen suicide in the age of social media.

Stanford professor Jonathan Berger turns golf stroke data into sound. A nice sound means it's a good swing, a sour sound means something's not right. He tells Scott Simon how that helps people learn.

Alaska holds its Democratic caucuses on Saturday, posing a logistical challenge to voters in the state's more remote locations. NPR's Scott Simon talks with Fairbanks caucus organizer Janelle Olson.

Yellow fever is spreading in Angola. Experts are afraid it could spread further in Africa and Asia. This couldn't come at a worse time.

Your fantasy "supercar" may be a Porsche 918 or Lamborghini. Now Honda wants to change your dream by rolling out the Acura NSX — the most expensive car ever built in the U.S. by a major manufacturer.

The Department of Education announcement may make it easier for students to get their money back.

Aid agencies are suspending some of the work they do at detention centers holding migrants in Greece. International Rescue Committee's Greece country director, Panos Navrozidis, explains why.

Peabody Coal, one of the largest coal producers in the world, is teetering on the edge of bankruptcy. It would be the latest in a string of major coal companies going under. But drive through Wyoming's Powder River Basin, where 40 percent of U.S. coal is mined, and it's as if nothing has changed, even at sites owned by bankrupt companies.

A biotech company says its genetically engineered mosquitoes could help Brazil and other countries fight the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which spread Zika and other viruses.

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