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Two teenage sisters who were sexually abused talk about how they supported each other through the ordeal.

Last week's story about what video game companies are doing to make their games more addictive made an impression on some Washington, D.C., third-graders. They wrote in with their thoughts.

Nathan Bedford Forrest High School in Jacksonville, Fla., was named decades ago for a Confederate hero — who was also the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. More than 160,000 people have signed a petition urging a name change, but the current name has also drawn passionate support.

The Secret Service made some immediate changes after the president's death 50 years ago this month: Open limousines were out. And it began taking a more aggressive approach to its advance work. Over the years, the service has established counter-sniper units, assault teams and surveillance units.

Schools nationwide are under growing pressure to add instructional time, and recess is often one of the first things to get squeezed — particularly in low-income districts. But some schools are pushing back, embracing play time and physical activity as central to learning.

Kraft says it's ditching two artificial dyes in some of its macaroni and cheese products. But why did we start coloring cheeses orange to begin with? Turn's out there's a curious history here.

The "school-to-prison pipeline" is what many activists call education policies that push troubled kids out of class, and into the criminal justice system. Broward County has taken steps to address those concerns by moving away from "zero tolerance" rules of discipline. Guest host Celeste Headlee discusses the new program with Marsha Ellison of the Broward County NAACP, and Michael Krezmien, a professor of student development at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

A hundred years after his birth, French writer and Nobel laureate Albert Camus is perhaps best-known around the world for novels like The Stranger and The Plague and his philosophy of absurdism. But it's his politics and views about Algeria's brutal fight for independence that continue to make waves in France.

It seems obvious to say that a high approval rating helps a president, while a low approval rating hurts him. But there are reasons to think Obama's weak standing in the polls isn't as troublesome as it sounds.

As a multitude of mobile devices dominate our work and personal lives, people are buying fewer pens, especially high-end ones. That's doomed many mom-and-pop pen shops, including a century-old New York City store that closed its doors in August. But a few stores are still holding on, relying on those who treat pens like jewelry.

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