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Should they or shouldn't they? That's the question Brazilians are asking themselves after Edward Snowden's "open letter" lauding Brazil's role in protecting privacy rights and alluding to his hand in uncovering spying against their president.

In 1964, President Johnson traveled to Martin County, Ky., to try to sell his "war on poverty" to the American public. The initiative spawned dozens of government programs, including Medicaid and Head Start. Residents in Martin County say the programs helped — but what they really need is steady work.

Alpine skier Lindsey Vonn's decision to withdraw from the 2014 Winter Olympics could mean big changes for companies that were planning to capitalize on her name — and on her potential wins. But some of Vonn's sponsors may find her announcement actually opens new advertising opportunities.

After a procedural vote in the Senate on a bill that would temporarily extend emergency insurance for the jobless, President Obama held a White House press conference to pressure Congress to keep the momentum going. But Republican leaders say they need spending cuts or job-creation plans in return.

Wearable technology is often said to look dorky. "Stylish" and "fashionable" are not words anyone would associate with devices like Google Glass or smart watches. But companies are now working to embed technology into clothing so that it's unobtrusive or even attractive.

Back in 1964, people smoked cigarettes at work, in restaurants and in grocery stores. Few would have predicted that a report from the U.S. surgeon general would spark a public health revolution that has increased life expectancy in this country by 30 percent.

This super cold air is usually whirling around the Arctic. But a big piece has plunged further south than normal. One way to think about what's happening: If a spinning ice skater extends her arms, she slows down. Sometimes, she wobbles and falls. The polar vortex has sort of stretched out an arm.

A new California law allows transgender students to choose restrooms and sport teams based on the gender they identify with. Host Michel Martin speaks with a parenting roundtable about the pros and cons.

Former Minnesota Vikings player Chris Kluwe is known for being outspoken – and sometimes pretty snarky too – especially when it comes to supporting same-sex marriage. Kluwe says that advocacy cost him his job, but he tells host Michel Martin, he has no regrets.

For hundreds of thousands of adult students, the General Educational Development test is a good way to finish their education. LaGuardia Community College in New York is going a step further, by tailoring prep courses for jobs in particular fields. Host Michel Martin speaks with Gail Mellow, the president of LaGuardia Community College to learn more.

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