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Leaders of the European Union continue their talks about bailing Greece out for a third time. NPR's Lynn Neary speaks to Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson about the proposals on the table.

It turns out that turning left at intersections is dangerous. So, two New York City councilmen have asked Google to map routes that cut down on left turns in the Big Apple.

From the capital to the countryside, there is pervasive fear in Greece as European leaders in Brussels debate the country's economic fate.

Ramadan this year falls in the height of summer when days are longest. Many Observant Muslims are fasting 16 hours a day or longer, so their pre-dawn breakfast needs to be hydrating and satiating.

European finance ministers are meeting to decide whether to give Greece another bailout. Correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi-Nelson gives NPR's Arun Rath an update from Brussels.

The video series by Dylan Marron lays bare the film industry's lack of diversity: By cutting all but the dialogue from nonwhite characters, the actor points out how little Hollywood gives them to say.

Lucy the Elephant is the oldest roadside attraction in America. Saved from the wrecking ball, she's a survivor among the increasingly endangered species of American roadside oddities.

Imagine: salads without Kalamata olives and bread without Greek olive oil. NPR's Wade Goodwyn talks with Costas Mastoras, owner of a Greek import store in New York, about how turmoil in Greece is affecting his business.

First-time investors were the hardest hit by China's stock market crash. Many who rushed to invest didn't have a high school education. NPR's Wade Goodwyn talks to economist Tom Orlitz of Bloomberg.

Independent investigation done for the American Psychological Association supports allegations that psychologists and APA officials enabled U.S. torture of prisoners in the wake of 9-11.

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