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The end of the 113th Congress means a lot of goodbyes for retiring members and for those who lost in November. That means, at least for a moment, partisanship took some time off on the Senate floor.

The Justice Department has decided not to make journalist James Risen reveal a source. Correspondent David Folkenflik tells NPR's Scott Simon about a case that became a flashpoint for press freedom.

NPR's Scott Simon talks with New York Times reporter Mark Mazzetti about the evolution of the CIA's approach to counter-terrorism, from interrogations to drone attacks.

Bloomberg View columnist Stephen Carter tells NPR's Scott Simon that, whether or not the CIA's interrogation techniques produced viable intelligence, they were still morally wrong.

The Senate is poised to pass the trillion-dollar spending bill that narrowly cleared the House this week. But anger about the measure from both parties has delayed the Senate.

The two leading Palestinian factions recently agreed to end a feud and work together. But in the Gaza Strip, the wounds have not healed from a nasty bout of infighting in 2007.

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will begin allowing first-time homebuyers to put down as little as 3 percent. But critics say the move is risky and could create another housing crisis.

Private companies used to make their own rules about guns on their property. But a growing number of states have adopted laws allowing workers to keep guns in their cars in the workplace parking lot.

This week, the Senate released a report that details the interrogation techniques used by the CIA after Sept. 11. Author Laila Lalami grapples with the questions it raises by turning to literature.

Maria Isabel de la Paz is an American citizen who grew up in Mexico, but her birth certificate was dismissed at border checkpoints. The ACLU says too few of these cases see the inside of a courtroom.




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