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The Library of Congress recently added 25 new recordings to its National Recording Registry, but none of them were hip-hop or rap songs. Did it miss a beat?

Max Huntsman's job is to monitor the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, one of the nation's most troubled law enforcement agencies. The only problem: He doesn't have any real legal power.

In ancient times scribes were used to record everything from prayers to legal transactions. Now they're making a comeback in the doctor's office, easing the transition to electronic medical records.

When adults are absorbed in their mobile devices, the consequences for children are not good. Research shows kids act out more if they are competing with a mobile device for their parent's attention.

More Americans are saving for retirement through their employers' 401(k) programs. That follows a move to automatically sign up workers to participate in the retirement savings plans.

Fortune 1000 companies rely on the open source software OpenSSL for their core business. Two-thirds of websites use it. But no one pays for it and it's never had a complete security audit.

The U.S. mainland's only Asian-majority congressional district sits in California's Silicon Valley, where two Indian-American candidates are trying to oust Japanese-American Congressman Mike Honda.

California farmers produce an enormous proportion of American produce, but the state is now experiencing a record-breaking drought that is being felt throughout the state and the U.S.

Instead of a public service announcement, the FBI has made Game of Pawns, a docudrama about a college student recruited by the Chinese government. The message is obvious: Don't be a spy.

It's been a grim Easter Sunday in South Korea as the death toll continues to rise from the ferry disaster that left nearly 300 passengers, many of them high school students, dead or missing.

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