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Southern California has had its own issues between police and communities of color. Many in the Simi Valley, near LA, are watching this week's news closely; it's home to many in law enforcement.

A powerful cyclone is tracking its way to the Philippines. NPR's Scott Simon gets the latest from reporter Aurora Almendral, in Manila.

President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf hopes to have no new Ebola cases by Dec. 25. But with the virus popping up in remote places and crossing over from neighboring countries, the battle is far from over.

Jose de Diego Middle School has large expanses of facade that are almost begging for decoration. To raise funds for arts education at the school, artists are helping transform its walls with paint.

Over the past 20 years, the Los Angeles Police Department has been reformed to work better with minority communities. One of the main forces behind that reform has been attorney Connie Rice.

Ruth Coker Burks has no medical training but has spent decades caring for people with AIDS. "I've buried over 40 people in my family's cemetery," she says, "because their families didn't want them."

With the number of new infections reaching a record high, there's no time to wait for international aid to build perfect Ebola treatment centers. So village leaders are making do with what they have.

Falling oil prices have been good news for the U.S. But they're causing multiple problems for some exporters. Government budgets are strained. Economies are struggling. Currencies are crashing.

Humboldt County is famous for towering redwoods — and pot. Every fall, young people descend on its small towns. They're seeking work as trimmers, who manicure marijuana buds to prepare them for sale.

Fast-casual chain Moo Cluck Moo, in suburban Detroit, pays all of its workers far above the typical wage for a fast-food employee. It's part of its business model.




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