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Perfectly manicured lawns are a bit of an obsession in Florida. But one Florida man is working on a project that's turning his neighbors' lawns into working farms.

It's that time of year when TV networks decide which shows to cancel and which to renew for the 2016-2017 season. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans gives an update on the new and canceled shows.

NPR Media Correspondent David Folkenflik, Wired's Issie Lapowsky and Ethan Zuckerman of MIT discuss allegations of bias against Facebook and social media's role in the news business.

Interfaith marriage is on the rise, putting parents in a tough spot to choose one religion to pass to their kids. Rami Ayyub reports on a Maryland Sunday school that says it's possible to have both.

The boycott, divestment and sanctions movement seeks to pressure Israel to stop building West Bank settlements. Laurie Goodstein of The New York Times explains the latest group to consider BDS.

The former head of Russia's anti-doping laboratory told The New York Times he helped to conceal doping by top Russian competitors in the 2014 Olympics. Russian officials are denying the report.

A new report on swaddling raised alarm for many new parents, but Joy Victory of HealthNewsReview.org tells NPR's Linda Wertheimer they needn't worry.

Graduation time is here and that means those folks who read names at graduation ceremonies are busy practicing. MIT takes pronunciation very seriously — but they'll still get some of them wrong.

Facebook CEO Sheryl Sandberg recently reflected on how hard it is to "lean in" without a supportive partner by her side. Lori Gottlieb is also a single mom, and she understands the challenge well.

In the parched fields of India's central states, the district of Beed in Maharashtra has been buffeted by a multi-year cycle of drought. One widow tells her story of coping with drought and loss.

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